Silver Star Medal

". . .for gallantry in action. . ."

Citations for miscellaneous units of the 104th Division.

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p>SILVER STAR MEDAL- By direction of the President, under the provisions of AR 600-45, September 22 1943, as amended, and pursuant to the authority contained in Paragraph 4, Section I, Circular No. 66, Headquarters, First United States Army, May 18 1944, the Silver Star Medal is awarded to the following:


BERMINGHAM, JAMES  R., Pvt First Class. G.O. #193, 104th Inf. Div.
(Army Serial Number 38668696), Infantry, Company E, 413th Infantry, United States Army, is awarded the silver star metal for gallantry in action in Germany on 21 April 1945.
While moving into an attack as lead scout, Private Bermingham successfully
located several prepared enemy positions which he engaged with rifle fire, killing six and capturing four enemy soldiers.  Accompanied by a few men, he then worked his way into a neighboring enemy-held town and captured three additional prisoners. These heroic actions, far above and beyond the call of duty, exemplify the finest military traditions and reflect the highest credit upon Private Bermingham and the armed forces of the United States. Entered military service from Bauxite, Arkansas.
By Command of the Division Commander, 1945.

BOHMAN, GEORGE  M., Jr. 1st Lt., 27 July 45, 104th Inf. Div
"For gallantry in action in Germany on 1 March 1945. In the assault on a strongly defended enemy town, Lieutenant Bohman, at great risk to his life and in the face of concentrated enemy artillery and mortar fire, went forward and reconnoitered possible sites for his mortars. As the action continued, Lieutenant Bohman ascertained that it was necessary for his platoon to secure a good observation post in order to deliver effective fire on the enemy. Disregarding the heavy enemy fire, he established an observation post in a prominent building and remained there for two days, despite constant enemy shelling. Lieutenant Bohman's courage and coolness under fire exemplify the finest traditions of the American officer and combat leader."
By Command of the Division Commander:


GROVE, WALTER D. Pvt First Class. G.O. #123, 104th Inf. Div.
Private First Class Walter
D. Grove (Army Serial Number 37149400), Infantry, Headquarters Company,
2d Battalion, 413th Infantry, United States Army, is awarded the Silver Star Medal for gallantry in actions in Germany on 2 March 1945. While engaged in clearing a road of mines prior to an important canal-crossing operation, a group of men were subjected to intense enemy small arms and automatic weapons fire. Undaunted, Private Grove continued to sweep the road for mines, advancing to the canal, where he discovered a bridge still intact. Returning, he led a group of engineers to the bridge site, securing a passage for friendly troops. By his gallant intrepidity and courage in the face of enemy fire, Private Grove contributed materially to the success of a subsequent canal-crossing operation with the minimum of casualties, reflection distinct credit upon himself and the armed forces of the United States. Entered military service from Spearfish, South Dakota.
By Command of the Division Commander, 1945.


GUTTERRIEZ, EDWARD A. Pvt First Class. G.O. #162, 104th Inf. Div.                         
Private First Class Edward A. Gutterriez ( Army Serial Number 38373718), Infantry Company A, 414th Infantry, United States Army, is awarded the Silver Star Medal for gallantry in action in Germany on 22 November 1944 and 10 December 1944. On 22 November 1944 Private Guttierrez made two trips through a ravine which was under a relentless hail of enemy fire to rescue two seriously wounded comrades, working tirelessly for three hours to save the lives of the two men. Again, on 10 December 1944, Private Guttierrez left his covered position to cross coverless terrain in the face of heavy fire to administer first aid to a comrade. Ascertaining that the wounded man could not be moved without a litter, and fully realizing that the company was to make a withdrawal, he remained with the wounded man, despite the withering fire for over ten hours until the objective was captured. The gallantry and intense devotion to his fellow soldiers displayed by Private Guttierrez exemplify the finest traditions of the American soldier. Entered military service from New Orleans, Louisiana.
By Command of the DivisionCommander:


LEIGON, WALTER A. Capt. G.O. #116, 23 April 45, 104th Inf. Div.                         
Captain Walter A. Leigon , (Army Serial Number O1289279), Infantry , Company F, 413th Infantry , United States Army, for gallantry in action in Germany on 23 March 1945. When his company was held up in it;s advance by well fortified enemy positions in a large castle, Captain Leigon called for tank support. The tanks were stopped in their advance by a road block, thereupon Captain Leigon and a companion went back to designate an alternate route. Although he and his companion were wounded , they continued their mission , guiding the tanks forward and designating targets from an exposed position. The fire from the tanks reduced enemy resistance and forced them to withdraw. Captain Leigon's singular gallantry, courage, and fearlessness in the face of enemy fire exemplify the finest traditions of the American combat commander and reflect distinct credit on himself and the military service. Entered military service from Clifton, Texas.
By command of the DIVISION COMMANDER:


MILLER, FRANK L. Capt. G.O. #33, 1944, 104th Inf. Div.
Captain Frank L. Miller  (Army Serial Number 0419068, Medical Corps, Medical Detachment, 413th Infantry, United States Army, is awarded the Silver Star Medal for gallantry in action in Germany on 27 November 1944. On 27 November 1944, Captain Miller, whose normal post of duty is in the rear of the battalion command post, voluntarily moved his battalion aid station to the town where the battalion observation post was located, knowing that the town was being subjected to an intense artillery barrage. With complete disregard for his personal safety and in the face of the intense artillery barrage, Captain Miller worked unceasingly for a twenty-four-hour period, evacuating ninety-nine casualties. The intensity of the artillery fire made it necessary to move the aid station several times and five members of the detachment were wounded by the fire. Captain Miller's courageous actions saved the lives of many soldiers, exemplifies the highest traditions of the American medical officer in his mission of mercy, and reflects the highest credit on himself and the armed forces of the United States. Entered military service from Collegeville, Pennsylvania.
By command of the Division Commander. 


NOLAN, WILLIAM R. S/Sgt. G.O. #197, 1945, 104th Inf. Div.
Staff Sergeant
William R. Nolan (then Private First Class) (Army Serial Number 12138599, Infantry, Company I, 413th Infantry, United States Army, is awarded the Silver Star Medal for gallantry in action in Germany on 22 November 1944. With unfaltering courage and devotion, Sergeant Nolan worked his way through a fire-raked orchard on five voluntary missions of mercy, aiding in the treatment and immediate evacuation o his wounded comrades. His gallant actions exemplified the finest military traditions and reflected the highest credit upon himself and the armed forces of the United States. Entered military service from Rochester, New York.
By command of the Division Commander.
 


NOTEBAERT, THOMAS G. Pfc.  G.O. #164, 12 May 1945, 104th Inf. Div.
Private First Class
Thomas G. Notebaert (then Private) (Army Serial Number 36583966), Infantry, Company F, 414th Infantry, United States Army, is awarded the Silver Star Medal for gallantry in action in Germany on 18 November 1944. At great risk to his life, Private Notebaert voluntarily dashed through devastating enemy fire to man a machine gun on a deserted tank. Despite intense enemy fire, Private Notebaert left the tank, made his way to the rear, and learned how to fire the 75 MM gun in the turret. Again braving the heavy fire, he returned to the tank and successfully knocked out an enemy machine gun next and pillbox. Private Notebaert's actions exemplified the finest traditions of the American soldier and reflect great credit upon himself and the armed forces of the United States. Entered military service from Detroit, Michigan.
By command of the Division Commander.
 


SCHMIDT, JAMES H. Pfc. G.O. #75, 14 March 1945, 104th Inf. Div.
Private First Class James H. Schmidt (then Private) (Army Serial Number 17119822). Infantry, Company D, 413th Infantry, United States Army, for gallantry in action in Germany on 29 November 1944. When his company became cut off from friendly troops, Private Schmidt voluntarily risked his life to reconnoiter a covered route to rejoin the battalion. Despite intense enemy fire he crossed 300 yards of open, fire-swept terrain, and returned to lead his company to safety. Private Schmidt's outstanding gallentry, intrepidity, and extreme sense of responsibility above and beyond the call of duty reflect the greatest credit upon himself and the armed forces of the United States. Entered military service from Hugoton, Kansas.
By command of the DIVISION COMMANDER:


SEIFERT, JOHN. S/Sgt. G.O. #41, 10 Feb 1945, 104th Inf. Div.
Staff Sergeant John Seifert( Army Serial Number 35673353), Infantry, Company L, 414th Infantry, United States Army, for gallantry in action in Germany on December 5, 1944. The company to which Sergeant Seifert was assigned attacked a huge factory in the early morning hours, driving the enemy to prepared positions across the narrow street from the factory. After repelling several counter attacks the company consolidated its position , and the enemy immediately placed incessant concentrations of artillery and mortar fire on their positions. Despite the intense fire the company retained its position and prepared to meet the counter attack which would inevitably follow the barrage. As the enemy infantry moved out of their positions, Sergeant Seifert led his light machine gun squad to the threatened point and directed fire against the attacking forces. Then, with complete disregard for his personal safety, he moved to an exposed position and fired rifle grenades at the advancing enemy troops and forced them to withdraw. Exhausting his supply of grenades, he crawled back to the factory, seized an enemy anti-tank rocket launcher, moved through the devestating fire to his former position, and forced the enemy to abandon two machine gun emplacements with his accurate fire. As the enemy ran from their positions, Sergeant Seifert's machine guns pinned them to the ground and inflicted numerous casualties. When the company was ordered to withdraw, Sergeant Seifert voluntarily covered the withdrawal by firing rockets at the enemy from an exposed position. The fearlessness and initiative of Sergeant Seifert throughout this action were responsible for the destruction of several enemy emplacements, the repulsion of a counter attack, and the successful withdrawal of the company prior to elimination of enemy fortifications by friendly artillery. His heroic actions, executed with complee disregard for personal safty, reflect the highest credit on himself and the armed forces of the United States. Entered military service from Dayton, Kentucky.
By command of the DIVISION COMMANDER:


SIEBEN, JAMES G. S/Sgt. G.O. #141, 16 May 45, 104th Inf. Div.                         
Staff Sergeant James G. Sieben (Army Serial Number 17157619). Infantry, Company F, 414th Infantry, United States Army, for gallantry in action in Germany on 30 March 1945. As tanks approached to assist in clearing out a town, Sergeant Sieben dashed across open, fire-swept terrain to mount the turret of a tank and direct fire which eliminated several enemy snipers. Later, when a tank was hit and set afire by enemy bazooka fire, he dashed into the open in the face of a hail of automatic weapons fire to extinguish the flames and save the tank from certain destruction. By his courage, quick thinking., and cool courage in the face of grave danger, Sergeant Sieben contributed materially to the success of an important operation, and his actions, above and beyond the call of duty, exemplify the finest traditions of the American combat soldier. Entered military service from Hastings, Minnesota.

SILVER STAR MEDAL (OAK LEAF CLUSTER) G.O. #166, 10 June 45, 104th Inf. Div
Staff Sergeant James G. Sieben (Army Serial Number 17167619) Infantry, Company F, 414th Infantry, United States Army, for gallantry in action in Germany on 17 November 1944. At great risk to their lives, Sergeant Sieben and two comrades crossed open terrain to search for one of the officers in their company who had been reported missing. They located the officer and found that he was severely wounded. Abandoning all attempts to seek cover or concealment, Sergeant Sieben and his companions carried the wounded officer back to their lines through a hail of small arms and mortar fire. The gallant intrepidity and intense devotion to duty and to his comrades displayed by Sergeant Sieben exemplify the finest traditions of the American soldier and reflect distinct credit upon himself and the military forces of the United States. Entered military service from Hastings, Minnesota.
By command of the DIVISION COMMANDER:


WELGAN, MICHAEL, Pfc. G.O. #___, __ ____ 45, 104th Inf. Div
Private First Class Michael Welgan (Army Serial Number 6706553), infantry, Company L, 413th Infantry United States Army, is awarded the Silver Star Medal for gallantry in action in Germany on 24 February 1945. When his platoon was caught on open ground under vicious enemy machine gun fire and direct enemy observation, Private Welgan voluntarily exposed himself completely to put his machine gun into action. He fired steadily despite the concentration of enemy fire upon him, and at one time he rushed twenty yards into the face of the enemy to secure a better position from which to continue his self-assigned task of covering his comrades' withdrawal. Private Welgan's gallant action, far above and beyond the call of duty, reflects the highest credit upon himself and the armed forces of the United States. Entered military service from New York City, New York.


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