Silver Star Medal

". . .for gallantry in action. . ."


Citations are abbreviated in the necessary conservation of web space. In doing so,
every effort is made to preserve the integrity of each award and recognize that these
gallant actions exemplified the finest military traditions and reflected the highest
credit upon those awarded and the armed forces of the United States.

* Posthumous Award


AIELLO, JAMES J. Pfc. G.O. #4, 5 June 45, 104th Inf. Div.
Pfc. James J. AIELLO, Jr., Company H, 415th Inf, by setting up his machine gun in a completely exposed position was able to neutralize devastating enemy machine gun fire. He continued his fire, forcing one enemy machine gun crew to surrender and enabling his company to secure the objective.


ALCANTAR, MAX L. Pfc. G.O. #20, 1 Dec 44, 104th Inf. Div.
When an enemy machine gun was located to the rear of the company, Pfc. Max L. ALCANTAR, Company K, 415th Infantry, an automatic rifleman in the first wave, silenced the gun. He was wounded by shrapnel, but maintained his position until the other men in the wave were successfully withdrawn.


*ALIOTO, JOHN Sgt. G.O. #86, 24 March 45, 104th Inf. Div.
During this action Sgt. John ALIOTO, Company K, 415th Infantry, although severely wounded, exposed himself to enemy fire to place accurate fire on a machine gun until it was knocked out. On reaching his command post he succumbed to his wounds.


ALLEN, JAMES R. S/Sgt. G.O. #10, 10 Jan 45, 104th Inf. Div.
S/Sgt. James R. ALLEN, Infantry, Company F, 414th Infantry, for gallantry in action in Germany. On 20 November 1944 the company to which Sergeant ALLEN was assigned was moving into a town already partially secured by two companies of the battalion. Leading elements of the company sighted an enemy patrol advancing boldly and, believing that they wished to surrender, failed to fire on them. Reaching the intersection the enemy treacherously opened fire killing one man, wounding another, and driving the rest to cover. Immediately the enemy placed a machine gun on the street corner and began firing at the advancing column forcing the men to take cover between the buildings of the narrow street. Sergeant ALLEN secured additional hand grenades from nearby men and, at great risk to his life, crawled up a road-side ditch, which was just deep enough to protect him. Reaching a point across the intersection from the machine gun, Sgt ALLEN threw his grenades from a prone position and forced the enemy to abandon their gun. When later it became necessary for his company to withdraw, the enemy again moved their gun to a firing position, but were driven off by Sgt. ALLEN, single-handely. Voluntarily and in spite of heavy fire and extreme danger of being cut off from the rear, Sgt. ALLEN remained at his post and repeatedly denied the enemy the use of the road crossing until his company had successfully withdrawn to security without further casulaties. His courageous action, carried out entirely on his own initiative, undoubtedly saved the lives of many of his comrades. Sgt. ALLEN's bravery, above and beyond the call of duty, is in keeping with the finest traditions of the armed forces and reflects the highest credit on himself and the military service. Entered military service from Staunton, Virginia.


ALVAREZ, GUILLERMO C. T/4 G.O. #20, 1 Dec 44 , 104th Inf. Div.
On this night Guillermo C. ALVAREZ of the 415th Inf Medical Detachment left his covered position under withering machine fire to go forward and give aid to and to evacuate a badly wounded man 100 yards away. The leg wound of the man made the process of the evacuation very slow, but ALVAREZ continued until he was brought back to safety.


ARBOGAST, EDWARD P. T/Sgt. G.O. #16, 21 Nov 44, 104th Inf. Div.
On this day T/Sgt. Edward P. ARBOGAST, Company A, 415th Infantry, crawled under devastating machine gun and mortar fire to a position where with hand grenades he silenced one of the enemy machine guns. A full moon added to the hazards of the exploit, but all night he continued his harassing fire at enemy positions, bolstering the morale of his platoon greatly by his actions.


ATKINSON, JACK S. Pfc. G.O. #153, 25 May 45, 104th Inf. Div.
Pfc. Jack S. ATKINSON, Company H, 415th Infantry, took up an exposed position in a second-story window and inflicted heavy losses with accurate fire from his machine gun on counter-attacking troops. The enemy detected his position, but he refused to abandon his gun although under a barrage of sniper, bazooka, panzerfaust and machine gun fire. As a result of his coolness in the face of grave danger, Pfc. ATKINSON single-handedly repulsed a serious threat to his unit’s position.


AUBREY, RICHARD A. 2nd Lt. G.O. #30, 30 Jan 45, 104th Inf. Div.
Second Lieutenant Richard A. AUBREY, 2nd LT. (later 1st Lt.) Company H, 41th Infantry: The enemy tank knocked out a friendly tank and moved up the road and fired directly into the company command post, killing Second Lt. William H. Sanders, observer for the 929th and mortally wounding First Lt. William L. Davidson, the company commander and several of his men. This tank, along with another which had penetrated the town defenses, then drew alongside the first platoon command post. Lt. AUBREY moved out into the open after the command post had been hit to reorganize the defenses of the company.


AXSOM, GEORGE H. 1st. Lt. G.O. #60, 25 Oct 44, 104th Inf. Div.
1st Lt.George H. AXSOM (then 2nd Lieutenant), Infantry Company H, 413th Infantry, United States Army, for gallantry in action in Holland on 25 October 1944. As the enemy opened fire from a wooded area, Lt. AXSOM leaped to his feet and, at great risk to his life, moved among the men of his platoon designating targets and calmly directing the fire of his guns throughout the day. At dusk Lt. AXSOM advanced with the leading assault groups, providing maximum protection for the advanced assault troops. The outstanding courage and superb leadership displayed by Lieutenant AXSOM in the first combat mission of his unit reflect the highest credit upon himself and the armed forces of the United States. Entered military service from Batlesville, Oklahoma.


BAKER, ROBERT E. Pfc. G.O. #98, 5 April 45, 104th Inf. Div.
Sgt. Joseph W. LUCKETT and Pfc. Robert E. BAKER, Company D, 415th Inf, remained behind when their section was forced to withdraw from counter-attacking infantry with two SP’s and one tank, firing a machine gun on the force. Only after the section reached cover did they move their gun to a new position to continue the fire.


BALINSKY, ADOLF P. Pfc. G.O. #155, 30 May 45, 104th Inf. Div.
Pfc. Adolf P. BALINSKY, Company G, 415th Inf, on 23 April assumed a position in a second-story window to cover the withdrawal of a squad of men who were retreating from a strong enemy counter-attack. Though five rounds from an enemy self-propelled gun struck the building, he continued his accurate fire, enabling his comrades to reach safety. He accounted for sixteen enemy dead.


*BENTLEY, JAMES H. T/Sgt. G.O. #141, 16 May 45, 104th Inf. Div.
During this engagement T/Sgt. James H. BENTLEY, Company K, 415th Inf, displayed exemplary courage by exposing himself to intense fire in order to direct his men to safety. The enemy had inaugurated a counter-attack led by three self-propelled guns, and it was Sgt. BENTLEY who attempted to thwart it with a bazooka. When the bazooka failed to fire, he ran 300 yards in the open to guide a tank destroyer into position. When he finally reached his men he had been mortally wounded.


BERMINGHAM, JAMES  R. Pvt First Class. G.O. #193, 104th Inf. Div.
(Army Serial Number 38668696), Infantry, Company E, 413th Infantry, United States Army, is awarded the silver star metal for gallantry in action in Germany on 21 April 1945. While moving into an attack as lead scout, Private BERMINGHAM successfully located several prepared enemy positions which he engaged with rifle fire, killing six and capturing four enemy soldiers.  Accompanied by a few men, he then worked his way into a neighboring enemy-held town and captured three additional prisoners. These heroic actions, far above and beyond the call of duty, exemplify the finest military traditions and reflect the highest credit upon Private Bermingham and the armed forces of the United States. Entered military service from Bauxite, Arkansas.
By Command of the Division Commander, 1945.


BERTSCH, DONALD H. Pfc. G.O. #22, 4 Dec 44, 104th Inf. Div.
Pfc. Donald M. BERTSCH, Company K, 415th Inf, had his right arm destroyed but improvised a tourniquet in order to be able to continue to lead his squad to new positions.


BLEIER, RALPH C. Pfc. G.O. #163, 7 June 45, 104th Inf. Div.
Pfc. Ralph C. BLEIER, Company D, 415 Inf, with lead assault troops, crossed open terrain to evacuate a wounded comrade across the river, then returned to join a machine gun platoon in the assault. When two more men were seriously injured, he evacuated them also across the mined fields. He returned to take up an exposed position on the flank, directing machine gun fire on the enemy.


BOLLINGER, GEORGE W. Pfc. G.O. #162, 6 June 45, 104th Inf. Div.
Pfc. Loyce N. Thompson and Pfc. George W. BOLLINGER, on 8 April when Company D, 415th Inf, was approaching an enemy-held town and subjected to heavy fire from an orchard, made their way to an exposed position where with a machine gun they killed twenty enemy soldiers, wounded twenty-three and forced the rest to surrender.


*BOHMAN, GEORGE M., Jr. 1st Lt., 27 July 45, 104th Inf. Div.
1 March 1945. In the assault on a strongly defended enemy town, 1st Lieutenant George M. BOHMAN, Company G, 413th Infantry, at great risk to his life and in the face of concentrated enemy artillery and mortar fire, went forward and reconnoitered possible sites for his mortars. As the action continued, Lieutenant Bohman ascertained that it was necessary for his platoon to secure a good observation post in order to deliver effective fire on the enemy. Disregarding the heavy enemy fire, he established an observation post in a prominent building and remained there for two days, despite constant enemy shelling. Lieutenant BOHMAN's courage and coolness under fire exemplify the finest traditions of the American officer and combat leader.


*BOSS, JOHN Pfc. G.O. #20, 1 Dec 44, 104th Inf. Div.
The outstanding performance of the day of 13 November was rendered by Pfc. John BOSS of Company K, 415th Infantry. The enemy that were located about three hundred yards to the front were using rockets as well as artillery upon elements of the Third Battalion. In spite of heavy fire, he took a sound powered phone and went to locate the positions of the rocket guns and report them to the artillery. In doing so he lost his life.


BOSWELL, LOUIS K. Sgt. G.O. #16, 21 Nov 44, 104th Inf. Div.
In the withdrawal of his company across the river there were many non-swimmers and Sgt. Louis K. BOSWELL, Company C, 415th Infantry, at great risk to his own life swam across the river to locate and bring back boats for the evacuation of the non-swimmers, as the assault boats and the bridge had been destroyed.


BOWLIN, PAUL R. Lt. G.O. #80, 19 March 45, 104th Inf. Div.
First Lieutenant Paul R. BOWLIN of Company E, 415th Infantry, left a covered position during this assault to administer first aid to five wounded men lying in the mined field on the far side of the creek. Later, under cover of darkness, Lt. BOWLIN returned to direct evacuation.


BOYLE, GEORGE V., Jr. Pfc. G.O. #106, 12 April 45, 104th Inf. Div.
It was originally intended for Company F to follow Company E at the same crossing site. However, this position was untenable and the unit crossed at Company G’s point. Pfc. George V. BOYLE, Jr., Company F’s 415th Infantry, was in a boat capsized by the enemy fire. BOYLE made three attempts, the third successful, to reach the shore, placed his mortar in position and brought fire on an enemy strong point until it was eliminated and overrun. He then returned to guide the remainder of his company's boats to the shore and gave first aid to the wounded.


BRADSHAW, ARCHIE L. S/Sgt. G.O. #22, 14 Dec 44, 104th Inf. Div.
During the night of 15-16 November, Staff Sgt. Archie L. BRADSHAW and Staff Sgt. Harry Coltin of Company E, 415th Infantry, led a combat patrol to investigate a pillbox. About 100 yards south of the pillbox the patrol surprised two Germans who were the outpost for the pillbox, captured them and sent them to the rear. Two German reliefs approaching the pillbox were also captured. As the patrol closed in on the pillbox and saw about eight Germans sitting around, Bradshaw called upon them to surrender. Sgt. Coltin placed a beehive charge against a door which blew it from its hinges. The Germans then threw out hand grenades and apparently called for the artillery fire which fell soon afterwards and forced the patrol to take cover in a trench.


BROWN, BEN T. Pvt. G.O. #150, 7 April 45, 104th Inf. Div.
Private First Class Ben T. BROWN (then Private), Infantry, G Company, 413th Inantry, for gallantry in action in Germany on 1 April 1945. Courageously and at great risk to his life, Pvt. BROWN crawled one hundred yards under withering, aimed enemy machine gunfire to the side of his platoon leader. After administering first aid, he moved the wounded man to a posiiton of defilade and returned across the same treacherous route until he found an aid man. Guiding the aid man, he crawled back to the wounded man's position where first aid was administered, saving the life of the seriously wounded man. By his intrepidity and courage in the face of enemy fire, Pvt. BROWN saved the life of his leader, and his actions, far above the call of duty, exemplify the finest traditions of the armed forces of the United States. Entered military service from Charleston, West Viriginia. Pvt. Ben T. BROWN of Company G of the 413th Infantry Regiment crawled 100 yards through machine gun fire to give first aid to his wounded platoon leader, removed him to temporary cover, returned through the same murderous fire already traversed to fine a medic, and then accompanied the medic back to the wounded platoon leader.


BURNS, GEORGE E. S/Sgt. G.O. #169, 12 June 45, 104th Inf. Div.
S/Sgt. George E. BURNS, Company F, 415th Infantry sighted a tank as his company advanced on the town, and volunteered to lead his platoon to eliminate the obstacle. Exposing himself to a hail of enemy fire, he single-handedly knocked out the tank with three well-placed bazooka rounds. Company E seized Deifeld at 1725 against light opposition.


BUURMA, CLARENCE B. Sgt. G.O. #171, 13 June 45, 104th Inf. Div.
On 13 December 1944, when his company had suffered heavy casualties and had been greatly reduced in strength, Sergeant BUURMA (then PFC, 414th Infantry, Company I) exposed himself to a relentless barrage of enemy artillery, mortar, and machine gun fire to single-handedly man a mortar and pour a devastating stream of fire on enemy positions, which averted a possible enemy counter-attack. Having no ammunition bearer, he was forced to make numerous trips across treacherous terrain to obtain ammunition, and while so doing he contacted the various outposts of his company and supplied them with valuable information.


BYTOF, OTTO Pvt. G.O. #19, 28 Nov. 44, 104th Inf. Div.
Capt. William Felkins, Battery C, 387th Field Artillery Battalion, secured the permission of his battalion commander to see Col. Cochran and Gen. Allen, and from them received authorization to take a party across the river to drive out the enemy infantry and tanks. Accompanied by Maj. Needham, First Battalion Commander and a group of infantrymen, he led the patrol across, after a preparatory barrage on the enemy. The patrol laid wire as it advanced, directing artillery support that killed many Germans and forced several of the tanks to withdraw. About 400 yards north of the river the patrol encountered a machine gun nest, and Capt. Felkins was killed when one of the infantrymen, attempting to knock out the machine gun crew, fired a rifle grenade with a ball cartridge. Five enlisted men of Battery C also volunteered for the mission and accompanied their commander. They were: S/Sgt. Harold C. Starr, T/5 Israel Langer, Pfc. Joseph J. Jordan, Pfc. James W. Cassidy and Pvt. Otto BYTOF.


CALLEN, JOSEPH W. Pfc. G.O. #164, 8 June 45, 104th Inf. Div.
Pfc. Joseph W. CALLEN, Company G, 415th Infantry, went forward with one squad to relieve a group of his company cut off by the enemy, accomplishing the mission only after he killed at least eight of the enemy and wounded many more himself, driving off an enemy counter-attacking force supported by an SP, with automatic fire.


CARDER, PAUL V. Pfc. G.O. #143, 18 May 45, 104th Inf. Div.
Pfc. Paul V. CARDER, Company I, 415th Infantry, on the same day led his squad forward to eliminate enemy machine guns in a building. Courageously exposing himself to withering fire, he destroyed the gun and killed the gunner with one grenade. Immediately after the explosion of the grenade he dashed into the house and with his sub-machine gun blazing, wiped out the rest of the crew and forced the surrender of eighteen enemy soldiers.


CARLSON, JAMES J. Pfc. G.O. #55, 23 Feb 45, 104th Inf. Div.
On the previous day Pfc. James CARLSON of the same company took command of his machine gun section when the section sergeant was wounded. During the night he supervised the digging of a new machine gun position and manned it with several wounded men. When the crew of one of the self-propelled 155mm gun crews suffered casualties on the 19th, Carlson took command of the gun and organized the remaining crew members to coordinate its fires with those of his machine guns to repel a furious enemy counter-attack.


CASSIDY, JAMES W. Pfc. G.O. #19, 28 Nov. 44, 104th Inf. Div.
(Included in Citation of Pvt. Otto Bytof.)


CLARK, RICHARD G. Pvt. G.O. #45, 14 Feb 45, 104th Inf. Div.
The crossing was made at the south edge of the Regimental sector at the blown Autobahn bridge. The precarious crossing was made with the aid of a log and a rope to negotiate a 20-foot drop. As they neared a German outpost, Pvt. Duane Robey stepped on a shu-mine losing his left foot, but he remained quiet. In withdrawing, carrying the wounded man, Pfc. Albert Gaines and T./4 Charles Lynds stepped on mines, each losing a foot. Enemy machine guns and mortars searched the area. The patrol struggled back to the bridge, where Lt. Pruitt silenced short-range fire with hand grenades. S/Sgt. John J. Major, platoon sergeant, and Pfc. Richard G. CLARK, another member of the patrol, each evacuated one of the wounded as did the injured platoon leader, under the withering fire. Meanwhile, Pfc. Harold Glick was dispatched to return for litter bearers, after he received a slight wound from a mine fragment.


CLOUGH, CASPER Maj. G.O. #40, 23 Dec 44, 104th Inf. Div.
Received Oak leaf Cluster to his Silver Star for coordinating the attack on Lucherberg at a great risk to his life.


COCHRAN, JOHN H. Col. G.O. #1, 1 Jan 45, 104th Inf. Div.
At midnight of the 21st Col. COCHRAN visited the First Battalion Command Post, encouraging the officers and men, and aided the staff in formulating a plan of attack for the following morning. Upon learning that heavy mortar and artillery fire had been the reason for the short advance during the day, Col. COCHRAN ordered a night attack on the following morning to forestall a pause in the battalion’s efforts. He then joined the front line troops and remained with them during the execution of the attack until he personally saw to it that the city was well held. The Silver Star Medal was awarded to the Regimental Commander for his determination to attain his objective and his leadership of his troops.


COHEN, SYDNEY M. Pfc. G.O. #130, 6 May 45, 104th Inf. Div.
Pfc. Sydney M. COHEN, Company K, on 26 March courageously moved to an exposed position to pour devastating fire on enemy troops advancing on his company’s newly-won objective, continuing, although the assault was led by tanks, until his hands were burned so badly he could no longer hold his automatic rifle. He continued to fire with an M1 rifle until the enemy withdrew, then bandaged his hands and helped administer first aid to the wounded.


COLLINS, RAYMOND D. Capt. G.O. #110, 17 April 45, 104th Inf. Div.
About 700 yards from the town the platoons split to the left and right of the road. Second platoon moved forward left to attack the northwest sector where it received heavy machine gun fire from the north. Capt. Raymond D. COLLINS observed four enemy machine gun emplacements as his company advanced across the open terrain, destroyed two himself with grenades and led his company in a furious assault into the town even before friendly artillery had lifted, overrunning advance positions.


COLTON, HARRY T/Sgt. G.O. #186, 7 Oct 45, 104th Inf. Div.
T/Sgt. Harry COLTON, Company E, leading an advanced security patrol, encountered dug-in enemy automatic weapons. After a hasty reconnaissance, he led his men in encircling a gun and rushing it from the rear, killing the crew. He then led the men in a daring bayonet charge and eliminated additional enemy infantry.


COLTIN, HARRY Sgt. G.O. #33. 16 Dec 44, 104th Inf. Div.
(Included in Citation of S/Sgt. Archie L. Bradshaw)


CONLEY, JAMES E Pfc. G.O. #24, 24 Jan 45, 104th Inf. Div.
Pfc. James E. CONLEY, Company G, after crossing the river led a combat group to clear the dike and secure ground for the others who were then crossing. Conley coolly led his men out of an ambush and after placing them in a defensive position returned under heavy rifle and machine gun fire to evacuate a wounded man. He then returned to his group and led them in the successful repulse of a severe counter-attack, holding his ground for four hours until help arrived.


*COOK, EDWIN Pfc. G.O. #21, 21 Jan 45, 104th Inf. Div.
Sgt. John E. Snider and Pfc. Edwin COOK of Company G, members of the crew of a light machine gun, covered a road block protecting against possible attack from the rear. The assault team was subjected to intense fire. Voluntarily the two men moved their machine gun into a position where they could fire at an enemy gun and then went forward to finish the job with hand grenades, both of them being killed in the action.


*CROSSON, LAVERNE E. Pfc. G.O. #145, 20 May 45, 104th Inf. Div.
Pfc. Laverne E. CROSSON volunteered with a companion to outflank a position where an enemy machine gun holding up their platoon was estimated to be. Two men accidentally ran into the position and in the fight which ensued the enemy position was destroyed, although CROSSON'S companion was killed during the action.


DAHLMAN, HERBERT W. Pfc. G.O. #19, 28 Nov 44, 104th Inf. Div.
Pfc. Herbert W. DAHLMAN and Pfc. Benjamin E. Fiedler, Jr., members of Company B, took over their platoon during the initial river crossing when leaders of the squads as well as the platoon leader became casualties. They successfully led the platoon in a 1000 yard advance under the most harassing conditions and directed them to dig in against tanks and enemy weapons. Fiedler lost his life in the action.


D’AMICO, JOHN S/Gt. G.O. #169, 12 June 45, 104th Inf. Div.
Though suffering from shock and exhaustion, S/Sgt. John D'AMICO, mortar observer of Company H, manned an observation post in Company G sector under extreme enemy mortar fire and aided in stopping numerous counter-attacks during the morning by accurate adjustments of mortar fire upon the enemy.


DANOWSKI, THOMAS Capt. G.O. #148, 23 May 45, 104th Inf. Div.
Capt. Thomas DANOWSKI, Commander of Company L, led an assault on machine gun positions firing on his advancing troops from wooded heights. In the swift advance up the steep slope pockets of Germans were left behind. Company L men called the intricately maneuvering hillside attack second "Lucherberg" as they finally reached Eudenberg on the crest. There they located coal pits from which mortars and rockets had been firing on them.


DAVIS, RAMOND E. Pfc. G.O. #46, 15 Feb 45, 104th Inf. Div.
Pfc. Ramond E. DAVIS had wiped out the four man crew of machine gun nest and now killed ten enemy who were armed with bazookas.


DEANE, JOHN R Maj. G.O. #19, 28 Nov 44, 104th Inf. Div.
Maj. John R. DEANE, Jr., who at his own request led the I and R Platoon into enemy held territory, became involved in a fire fight in a strong defensive area manned by about sixty men. Maj. DEANE did not withdraw the platoon until the mission was accomplished and information radioed back to the Regiment, thus saving the entire First Battalion from ambush.


DECKER, GEORGE B. 2nd Lt. G.O. #171, 13 June 45, 104th Inf. Div.
During the day Second Lt. George G. DECKER, Battery B, 929th Field Artillery Battalion, distinguished himself while serving as a forward observer with the Second Battalion by advancing ahead of the main body attempting to neutralize the pillboxes. He made his way through the area strewn with anti-personnel mines and reached a point seventy yards from the enemy strongholds. From this position he skillfully delivered effective eight-inch howitzer fire that was found the following day to have helped in making the strong points untenable for the enemy.


DELROUGH, MAX T/Sgt. G.O. #168, 12 June 45, 104th Inf. Div.
T/Sgt. Max DELROUGH, Company L, on April 2, when tanks were halted by AT mines and tree-fixed demolitions fired by remote control, advanced to remove the obstacle. With two companions, he advanced under grazing fire, single-handedly cut the wires leading to the charger, attached the wires to the mines and boldly pulled them off the road, enabling the armor to advance.


DEVOSS, GARFIELD A. S/Sgt. G.O. #86, 24 March 45, 104th Inf. Div.
S/Sgt. Garfield A. DEVOSS boldly led his platoon through an icy pond to an objective, promptly reconnoitering the area in the face of intense fire to set up an effective defense.


*DICKERSON, THOMAS E. Pfc. G.O. #107, 14 April 45, 104th Inf. Div.
Pfc. Thomas E. DICKERSON, Headquarters Company, Third Battalion, was a member of a bazooka team entering the town under deadly fire which had made repeated attempts to register for on a sheltered SP. DICKERSON advanced to a position close to the gun, and directed fire on the gun until a direct hit mortally wounded him.


*DONNELLY, GLEN S. Pvt. G.O. #44, 27 Dec 44, 104th Inf. Div.
Private First Class Glen S. DONNELLY, Company L, 415th Infantry. Because of heavy mortar fire, Private Glen S. DONNELLY, though wounded, made repeated trips to aid and evacuate wounded in the face of this fire. He submitted to treatment only after every man had been evacuated.


DUCAT, HARRY A. S/Sgt. G.O. #45, 28 Dec 44, 104th Inf. Div.
S/Sgt. Harry a DUCAT led his men gallantly in repelling four counter-attacks.


DYER, WILLIAM C. Capt. G.O. #151, 26 May 45, 104th Inf. Div.
Company E’s point was ambushed by enemy machine guns, and Capt. DYER, Company Commander, when the other members of the group became casualties, attempted to knock the machine guns out with grenades until automatic weapons could be rushed up. He led two subsequent night assaults against the guns, eliminating them and allowing the company to advance.


EAVES, ROYCE L. 2nd Lt. G.O. #162, 6 June 45, 104th Inf. Div.
Company D was under the command of Second Lt. Royce L. EAVES who had assumed these duties when all the other company officers had become casualties during the river crossing. He directed a devastating barrage of fire which greatly aided the assault elements. He maintained his mortar positions for this period, devising and conducting a fire plan which allowed armor to cross the river in force by destroying heavy enemy installations.


EISTER, ALBERT Capt. G.O. #46, 29 Dec 44, 104th Inf. Div.
One example of the aggressiveness in reconnaissance of the members of the 929th Field Artillery Battalion throughout the period of combat operations occurred on 25 November when Captain Albert EISTER and his first sergeant, Homer S. Regan, of Battery A approached a large building of the huge factory in Weisweiler for the purpose of locating gun positions in the nearby field. Two enemy soldiers ran out to man anti-tank guns guarding the entrance to the factory. Capt. EISTER and Sgt. Regan took the two men prisoners and a few minutes later captured three more men in the building. In this advance position the two Americans set up an observation post and then directed artillery fire under cover of which the infantry was able to move in and mop up the area, capturing many prisoners, including three from the first floor of the building in which the observation post was located. Sgt. Regan remained in the building overnight with three other men and continued to direct fire. Their battalion was reinforcing the fires of another artillery battalion in the division, in which case it is not even normal for the reinforcing battalion to send out forward observers to the assault companies.


FIALA, JOSEPH S. Pfc. G.O. #43, 26 Nov 44, 104th Inf. Div.
On 26 November 1944, having been replused in their first attempt to capture an objective, the company to which Private Fiala was assigned attacked a second time across 800 yards of open, flat terrain toward a strongly defended enemy stronghold. As first scout of the leading assault unit, Private Fiala was well in advance of the platoon when it was pinned down 200 yards from its objective by severe cross fire from heavy enemy machine guns. Realizing that the company must continue its advance despite the merciless enemy fire, Private Fiala rose to his feet and ran back 100 yards to his platoon, walking boldly among his comrades, completely exposed to enemy fire, calling to them to follow him forward. Inspired by Private Fiala's fearlessness, the platoon advanced through the intense fire, quickly destroyed the foremost enemy emplacments, and again under Private Fiala's inspiring leadership, advanced and captured the secondary defense positions. Private Fiala was fatally wounded in leading this advance, but his heroic action, far above and beyond the call of duty, is in keeping with the finest traditions of the armed forces and reflects the greatest credit on himself and the military service. Entered miliary service from Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.


FIBRANZ, OTTO W. Pfc. G.O. #83, 21 March 45, 104th Inf. Div.
Pfc. Otto W. FIBRANZ returned to help a comrade struggling in the icy river, then courageously led four men across a collapsed bridge, forming a human chain by standing in the icy water to assist the exhausted men to safety. All the time under withering fire, he then carried one of his fellow soldiers across 300 yards of open terrain to an aid station.


*FIEDLER, BENJAMIN E. Pfc. G.O. #19, 28 Nov 44, 104th Inf. Div.
(Included in Citation of Pfc. Herbert W. Dahlman.)


FLEMING, DONALD C. Pfc. G.O. #47, 30 Dec 44, 104th Inf. Div.
Shortly after daylight, enemy were seen moving in against the house and Lts. Shipley and Ulmer called down artillery and mortar fire around their own positions. Pfc. Donald C. FLEMING  radioed the requests and also sniped against the approaching enemy. He personally accounted for thirteen enemy paratroopers by effective employment of a Tommy-gun, M-1 rifle and grenades. All the friendly troops were inside and could not be hurt by the flying shrapnel of the rounds exploding just outside of the house. Mortars were adjusted on targets near the building and the artillery and cannons placed heavy concentrations all over the remainder of the town.


FOX, ERNEST D. 1st Lt. G.O. #19, 28 Nov 44, 104th Inf. Div.
About 0900 the Second Battalion in its advance found First Lt. Ernest D. FOX and Lt. George K. Squier with about sixty-five men of Companies A, B and C in the position they had held since being cut off three days before. In addition to enemy tank, mortar and artillery attacks, they had been subjected to American artillery fire. The brave force had subsisted on turnips and beets and by expert use of cover sustained no casualties during the time they were isolated from the Battalion. Lt. FOX had led his bank of men across boggy ground under deadly shell fire and instructed them to dig in, after which he calmly controlled all actions until they were rescued by the Second Battalion.


FRANKLIN, JAMES O. Sgt. G.O. #89, 27 March 45, 104th Inf. Div.
In the midst of the counter attack Company I and two platoons of tanks and tank destroyers arrived and relieved the pressure on Company K. Their advance had also been impeded by strafing and bombing from the German planes which were aloft near Birkesdorf. These reinforcing units overcame a number of machine gun emplacements and knocked out two self-propelled guns that had caused much damage to Company K. T/Sgt. Charles Shotts and Sgt. James O. FRANKLIN of Company I fired their bazooka at a German tank fifty yards away and forced it to withdraw.


FULLAM, WILLIAM B. Pfc. G.O. #87, 25 March 45, 104th Inf. Div.
23 Feb ‘45. Pfc. Fullam crossed a river with the first assault waves to provide security for the engineer construction crews. He assisted in evacuating a wounded man from an enemy mine field, and when the party was fired upon, he crawled to a trench and killed the enemy sniper. Later in the day he single-handedly eliminated an automatic weapon with well placed hand grenades.


FULTON, CHARLES G. Sgt. G.O. #130, 6 May 45, 104th Inf. Div.
Sgt. Charles G. FULTON and Pfc. Bruce H. Harter, Company D, who remained behind to cover the withdrawal of their platoon, were forced to withdraw when a large body of enemy troops led by a tank and two SP’s moved on their position. They engaged the enemy with small arms fire, then covered each other as they scaled a ten-foot wall to safety.


GAVITT, BURTON S. T/4 G.O. #19, 28 Nov 44, 104th Inf. Div.
Examples of heroism were in mounting evidence. T/4 Burton S. GAVITT, Medical Detachment, as an aid man gave aid to the wounded under intense shell fire and, although twice wounded himself, continued his ministrations with utter disregard for his own personal safety. After eleven hours of ceaseless labor he dropped, exhausted.


GLAWSON, JAMES L. Pfc. G.O. #155, 30 may 45, 104th Inf. Div.
Pfc. James L. GLAWSON, Company E, on this day, 17 April, showed superb leadership by taking over his squad during an attack on the strongly-held objective. Both the squad leader and the assistant squad leader wounded, GLAWSON led the men in a flanking attack on an enemy machine gun, successfully destroying it, and killed five retreating enemy soldiers.


GORE, AMOS T/Sgt. G.O. #145, 20 May 45, 104th Inf. Div.
T/Sgt. Amos GORE, of the same company and on the same day, 25 March, exposed himself to deadly enemy fire to single-handedly wipe out an enemy machine gun nest and then led a charge on two other machine gun positions, forcing the Germans to withdraw.


GOLUB, STANLEY D. 1st Lt. G.O. #22, 4 Dec 44, 104th Inf. Div.
At about 0130 on the morning of 26 October 1944, after having advanced about 800 yards from the line of departure, the battalion to which Lieutenant Golub was assigned ran into heavy enemy artillery, mortar, and machine gun fire from well prepared enemy defensive positions of which they had no previous knowledge. Poor visibility, lack of cover, the intensity of enemy fire and the flat marshy terrain made their position untenable, so a general withdrawal was ordered. In spite of the danger, and at great risk of life, Lieutenant Golub remained with the forward elements of his battalion assisting in the withdrawal. In spite of the total darkness, the intensity of enemy fire, and the newness of the troops in combat, the withdrawal was successfully accomplished. The assistance of Lieutenant Golub, with utter disregard for his personal safety exemplified by his constant personal supervision and superior leadership was invaluable in the accomplishment of this maneuver. This act of courage and bravery at great peril of his life brings him great credit and reflects the highest qualities of the American soldier. Entered military service from Seattle, Washington.


GREEN, ROBERT D. Pfc. G.O #171, 1 Mar 45, 104th Inf. Div.
Pfc Robert D. GREEN, Infantry, Company F, 413th Infantry, United States Army, is awarded the Silver Star Medal for gallantry in action in Germany on 1 March 1945. When Private GREEN found that his rifle would not fire as an enemy patrol approached the isolated observation post he was manning alone, he leapt from a second story window upon the lead man of the patrol, striking him down with the butt of his rifle. This act surprised and disorganized the other enemy soldiers, and they all surrendered to him at once. Thus, with no thought to his own safety, he courageously protected the safety of the unit to the rear, and his action, far beyond the call of duty, exemplifies the finest traditions of the American combat soldier, reflecting the highest credit upon himself and the armed forces of the United States. Entered military service from Center, Texas.


GROSS, FRED L. Pfc. G.O. #16, 21 Nov 44, 104th Inf. Div.
With the withdrawal of his company impeded by four tanks covered with infantrymen armed with automatic weapons, Pfc. Fred L. GROSS took a light machine gun and with it killed at least twenty-five of the Germans riding the tanks and forced the tanks to withdraw and reorganize, during which time most of his comrades were able to withdraw to safety.


GROVE, WALTER D. Pvt First Class. G.O. #123, 104th Inf. Div.
2 March 1945. While engaged in clearing a road of mines prior to an important canal-crossing operation, a group of men were subjected to intense enemy small arms and automatic weapons fire. Undaunted, Private GROVE continued to sweep the road for mines, advancing to the canal, where he discovered a bridge still intact. Returning, he led a group of engineers to the bridge site, securing a passage for friendly troops. By his gallant intrepidity and courage in the face of enemy fire, Private GROVE contributed materially to the success of a subsequent canal-crossing operation with the minimum of casualties, reflecting distinct credit upon himself and the armed forces of the United States. Entered military service from Spearfish, South Dakota.
By Command of the Division Commander, 1945.


GUTTIEREZ, EDWARD A. Pvt First Class. G.O. #162, 104th Inf. Div.
On 22 November 1944 Private GUTTIEREZ made two trips through a ravine which was under a relentless hail of enemy fire to rescue two seriously wounded comrades, working tirelessly for three hours to save the lives of the two men. Again, on 10 December 1944, Private GUTTIEREZ left his covered position to cross coverless terrain in the face of heavy fire to administer first aid to a comrade. Ascertaining that the wounded man could not be moved without a litter, and fully realizing that the company was to make a withdrawal, he remained with the wounded man, despite the withering fire for over ten hours until the objective was captured.


HALABRIN, RICHARD S. Cpl. G.O. #168, 12 June 45, 104th Inf. Div.
Cpl. Richard S. HALABRIN, Company H, administered first aid to a wounded comrade under a hail of fire while troops were halted in the woods by artillery fire. He fashioned a stretcher from a cart and evacuated the man.


HALLAHAN, FRANCIS J. Capt. G.O. #169, 12 June 45, 104th Inf. Div.
In the original plan for the attack, Company L commanded by Capt. Francis J. HALLAHAN, was to follow Company I across the railroad bridge at Inden. As the latter company was crossing in single file, enemy mortar fire was falling to the right but did not inflict any wounds on the troops. An enemy flare enabled the mortar observer to direct the mortar bursts more accurately. After two attempts of Company L to cross only met with heavier fire, the first platoon moved to Lamersdorf at 0300 and crossed at the site used by Company G. This group under Capt. HALLAHAN reached the factory at 0400. Later the remainder of the company under 1st Lt. Thomas E. Danowski was again repulsed by enemy fire. Danowski then led his men south along the west bank of the river until they came to the point where the first platoon had forded the stream. Here the engineers who were attempting to throw a bridge across the river had drawn artillery and machine gun fire on themselves. Danowski retraced his steps to Inden, reconnoitering the river bank for a possible ford but found everywhere that the water was too deep. He was then ordered to cross on the foot bridge at Frenz. This was accomplished by daylight and he had his men crawl along the railroad embankment east of the river behind him. While he was on his way back from checking the situation with Company E in the chateau, he took several prisoners from the trenches. When he rejoined his men, elements of Company F were seen fording the river at Lamersdorf. When his men reached the junction of the railroad and the road from Lamersdorf to Lucherberg, therefore, he had them spurting to the factory for protection and joined Capt. HALLAHAN with the first platoon about noon.


HARRIS, JAMES D. Pfc. G.O. #161 25 Feb 45, 104th Inf. Div.
Private First Class James D. Harris, Infantry, Company F, 413th Infantry, United States Army for gallantry in action in Germany on 25 February 1945. Seeing an enemy machine gunner and two snipers shifting their positions to fire on two wounded men, Private Harris exposed himself to muderous enemy fire to take up an exposed position from which he killed the enemy machine gunner and both snipers with his machine gun. Retaining his position, he covered the advance of his comrades in the assault and capture of the objective. Private Harris' gallantry and intense devotion to duty were responsible for saving the lives of two of his comrades and exemplified the finest traditions of the American combat soldier, reflecting the highest credit upon himself and the military service. Entered military service from Birmingham, Alabama.


*HARRISON, ROBERT S. S/Sgt. G.O. #142, 17 May 45, 104th Inf. Div.
Lt. Col. Casper Clough’s Third Battalion attacked at 1500 toward Kustelberg with Companies I and K moving through a wooded sector. S/Sgt. Robert S. HARRISON, Company K, was leading his men through the woods when the entire Battalion met stiff opposition two kilometers from the objective. Sgt. HARRISON'S squad was subjected to withering machine gun fire. He boldly advanced and wiped out the gun with accurate fire. (Later, he was mortally wounded while exposing himself to artillery and mortar fire to give aid to the wounded.)


HARTER, BRUCE H. Pfc. G.O. #131, 7 May 45, 104th Inf. Div.
(See Citation of Charles G. Fulton.)


*HAYES, HUGH P. Pfc. G.O. #103, 10 April 45, 104th Inf. Div.
Pfc. Hugh P. HAYES, Medical Detachment, while following closely behind assault elements attacking a town, crossed a canal and an adjoining flooded area to administer aid to many wounded men. In the face of enemy fire, he swam back across the canal to help another man, then again set out to recross the canal through a hail of intense fire and was mortally wounded.


HEDDEN, FRANK H. First Lt. G.O. #151 26 May 45, 104th Inf. Div.
In the assault on a strongly defended town, Lieutenant HEDDEN’S platoon was pinned down by murderous fire from flak guns and automatic weapons. At great risk to his life, Lieutenant HEDDEN exposed himself continually in order to deploy his platoon and set up an effective field of fire. This maneuver was instrumental in the capture of the town.


HERNANDEZ, IGNACIO Pfc. G.O. #93, 31 March 45, 104th Inf. Div.
Pfc. John L. Stage and Pfc. Ignacio HERNANDEZ, Company E, and their platoon leader rushed enemy trenches, bunkers, and straw stacks, flushing enemy along the company front after two companies had been halted by the deadly fire of three machine guns, seven automatic weapons, and several rifles. They captured sixteen of the enemy.


*HILL, ROY C. S/Sgt. G.O. #20, 1 Dec 44, 104th Inf. Div.
S/Sgt. Roy D. HILL, Medical Detachment, left his covered position on 30 October to give aid to the wounded of his company and other units as well, losing his own life during the action.


HOOKER, JERRY S. Capt. G.O. #169, 12 June 45, 104th Inf. Div.
Capt. Jerry S. HOOKER, Company C, leading his men to secure the outskirts of Arnoldsweller, took a bazooka, and accompanied by two men, went to the flank of an enemy machine gun with two rounds. Although wounded by artillery fire, he continued to lead the assault until the objective was taken.


HUGHES, HENRY W. Pfc. G.O. #152, 27 May 45, 104th Inf. Div.
Pfc. Henry W. HUGHES, Company A, left his covered position when two tanks were put out of action and fourteen tank-riding infantrymen seriously wounded, to contact an aid man. After leading the medic through devastating machine gun fire to the injured men, he crossed fire-swept terrain to secure a radio call for litter bearers. When they arrived he led them through the intense fire to the wounded.


*JABLONSKI, JOSEPH A. S/Sgt. G.O. #135, 11 May 45, 104th Inf. Div.
S/Sgt. Joseph A. JABLONSKI advanced in the face of withering fire to silence an enemy machine gun which had inflicted heavy casualties on men of his squad and other troops crossing the Roer. He single-handedly silenced the gun but was mortally wounded in the performance of his self-assigned mission.


JEFFERSON, JR., JUNE Pvt. G.O. #150, 25 May 1945, 104th Inf. Div.
Pvt. June JEFFERSON, JR., Company A, 414th Infantry, for gallantry in action in Germany on 9 April 45. When an enemy tank crashed through a road block and entered a recenlty captured town, Pvt. JEFFERSON voluntarily and at great risk to his life, crossed open, fire-swept terrain in the face of direct fire from the tank, made his way to the house where the tank was located and dropped incendiary and fragmentation grenades into the open turret of the tank, causing it to catch fire. As the crew emerged, he killed them with his rifle. He then returned to his position and quickly organized an assault of the enemy riflemen who were supporting the tank, killing, wounding, or capturing all of the enemy infantrymen. Pvt. JEFFERSON's audacious gallantry and intrepidity in attacking and destroying an enemy tank single-handedly exemplify the finest traditions of the American combat soldier. Entered military service from Brooklyn, New York.


JONES, HEARL Pvt. G.O. #183, 4 Oct 1945, 104th Inf. Div.
Pvt. Hearl JONES, Company B, 415th Infantry, opened fire at close range, and killed six of the enemy - holding the enemy force at bay until artillery and machine guns could be brought to use. Later in the day he located and destroyed an enemy machine gun nest.


JORDAN, JOSEPH J. Pfc. G.O. #19, 28 Nov 44, 104th Inf. Div.
(See Citation of Pvt. Otto Bytof.)


KALUNIAN, EDWARD S. Pfc. G.O. #185, 6 Oct 45, 104th Inf. Div.
Later on about 0700 this same tank was found about 75 yards from the position. Corporal Victor Miskow and Pfc. Edward S. KALUNIAN moved the gun into the street from the archway where it had been placed for protection and opened fire. The tank turned tail and fled towards Pier after the second hit on it by the 57mm gun. The tank finally stopped, 500 yards beyond town after the crew had pumped many rounds into it as it left Lucherberg.


KILPATRICK, KENNETH S. S/Sgt. G.O. #97, 4 April 45, 104th Inf. Div.
S/Sgt. Kenneth S. KILPATRICK, after making repeated crossings of the river, led his squad across 400 yards of open terrain to assault and capture the Unt Ketternach factory. Although painfully wounded in the arm he seized a bazooka from a wounded man and with three rounds silenced three automatic weapons.


KIMBALL, FRANK 1st Lt. G.O. #38, 21 Dec 44, 104th Inf. Div.
The assault platoon of Company L was led by First Lieutenant Frank KIMBALL. He was forced to establish a temporary defense line 20 yards from the limited objective assigned his company. During the night he led his platoon in repulsing enemy counter-attack and maintained a barrage of fire with five different weapons and hand grenades with deadly accuracy at a distance as little as five yards. In addition all casualties were evacuated through his courageous action.


KIRBY, JAMES E. Pvt. G.O.#23, 6 Dec 44, 104th Inf. Div.
Pvt. James E. KIRBY, Company L, remained after the withdrawal in a house in which were several wounded men. He repelled several attacks by an enemy patrol and assisted in the evacuation of the wounded on the following morning.


LAMKEN, WILLIAM J. S/Sgt. G.O. #152, 27 May 45, 104th Inf. Div.
Company F met little resistance in moving through Ramsin and Zscherndorf, one mile south of Sandersdorf, but the other assault companies were met by a determined defense as they approached Sandersdorf across flat, uncovered ground. S/Sgt. William J. LAMKEN, Company H, led his section in the face of grazing machine gun fire. Seizing a jammed machine gun and correcting the stoppage, LAMKEN advanced on the enemy position with the gun blazing from his hip. Undaunted by the enemy fire, he drove twenty troops from freight cars and captured one prisoner. Returning to his sector, he led his men in a renewed attack on the objective and was instrumental in repelling an enemy counter-attack.


LAMOND, ALLEN A. First Lt. G.O. #288 23 Feb 45, 104th Inf. Div.
Following an assault across the Roer River, three men of a infantry company were seriously wounded in a mine-field. As their company continued their assault, leaving the three men behind, Lt. LAMOND voluntarily entered the heavily mined area, under heavy enemy fire, to rescue the wounded soldiers.He probed his way to each man in turn, removing several Shu-mines before he could safely rescue them, one at a time. These men were unable help themselves, all having been weakened by shock, loss of limb, and loss of blood, Lt. LAMOND, by his brave, skillful action, removed the men and thus undoubtedly saved their lives.


LANGER, ISRAEL T/5 G.O. #19, 28 Nov 44, 104th Inf. Div.
(See Citation of Pvt. Otto Bytof.)


LaPORTE, ALBERT A. Pfc. G.O. #180, (no date) 104th Inf. Div.
Pfc. Albert A. LAPORTE of Company L, 415th Infantry received the Silver Star for gallantry in action by wiping out an enemy machine gun crew with hand grenades and rifle fire.


LAWRENCE, VAUGHN W. S/Sgt. G.O. #94, 1 April 45, 104th Inf. Div.
S/Sgt. Vaughn W. LAWRENCE, Company B, single-handedly cleared a row of houses, capturing one soldier, killing another, and putting the rest to flight, helping to make possible the consolidation of his company in the face of the enemy counter-attack.


LeBLANC, ORA J. T/Sgt. G.O. #169, 12 June 45, 104th Inf. Div.
When Company I was advancing on its objective the men were pinned to the ground by cross fire from machine guns. First making a hasty reconnaissance, T/Sgt.Ora J. LEBLANC led his men in a flanking move to the rear of the enemy. One of his men who had crawled forward to knock out the machine gun nests with grenades was seriously wounded, and Sgt. LEBLANC immediately crossed open terrain to aid and evacuate the wounded man. He then moved forward, wiped out the machine gun nests with hand grenades, and continued with his remaining four men eliminating two mortar positions.


LEIGON, WALTER A. Capt. G.O. #116, 23 April 45, 104th Inf. Div.
23 March 1945. When his Company F, 413th Infantry was held up in it;s advance by well fortified enemy positions in a large castle, Captain Leigon called for tank support. The tanks were stopped in their advance by a road block, thereupon Captain Leigon and a companion went back to designate an alternate route. Although he and his companion were wounded , they continued their mission , guiding the tanks forward and designating targets from an exposed position. The fire from the tanks reduced enemy resistance and forced them to withdraw. Captain Leigon's singular gallantry, courage, and fearlessness in the face of enemy fire exemplify the finest traditions of the American combat commander and reflect distinct credit on himself and the military service. Entered military service from Clifton, Texas.


LIGTVOET, JOHN W. Pfc. G.O. #167, 104th Inf. Div.
Sergeant LIGTVOET was a member of the first assault wave that was to cross a river. On his first attempt, one man was killed and two were wounded in his boat by deadly cross fire from enemy machine guns, and the rest of the crew members were forced to abandon the boat. Sergeant LIGTVOET assisted the wounded men to shore, attempted a second crossing, and was again forced into the water. Finding some men on a small island, he organized another boat crew, and inspiring his men with almost superhuman endurance, he gained the enemy shore after having one man killed and one man wounded. He assisted the wounded man to a covered position and organized the rest of the men in forming a defensive position. Later in the day he volunteered to find a boat and evacuate the wounded man, but he was forced to return due to deadly machine gun fire.


LINDSEY, JAMES J. G.O. #189, 10 Oct 45, 104th Inf. Div.
Earlier in the day James J. LINDSEY of Company C had destroyed a machine gun nest with hand grenades after disposing of two enemy soldiers by shooting one and slugging the other unconscious. When another machine gun position in the center of town held up his company’s advance about 1600, he exposed himself to direct the fire of one of the tanks to silence the enemy weapon.


*LINDSTROM, STUART B. Sgt. G.O. #86, 24 March 45, 104th Inf. Div.
Sgt. Stuart B. LINDSTROM crawled towards the fire to destroy the gun. With two well-aimed grenades he single-handedly destroyed the machine gun nest but was fatally wounded while attempting to return to his group. Flares dropped by enemy planes and a nearby burning hay stack silhouetted the men and made them perfect targets. The platoon also ran unexpectedly upon a lake and many found themselves up to their chins in icy water strung with barbed wire.


LUCKETT, JOSEPH W. Sgt. G.O. #99, 6 April 45, 104th Inf. Div.
(See Citation of Robert E. Baker.)


MAHAN, JOHN W. Pvt. G.O. #37, 6 Feb 45, 104th Inf. Div.
Pvt. JOHN W.MAHAN, Company L, 413th Infantry, for gallantry in action in Germany on 6 January 1945. Pvt. MAHAN was a member of a patrol which crossed a river with the mission of capturing an enemy soldier. As the men waded through the icy waters, they encountered frontal fire from enemy positions on the opposite bank. Despite the handicap of losing the element of surprise, the men continued across the river, through the enemy lines, and into a system of trenches where the platoon became involved in a fire-fight with the enemy. Pvt. MAHAN and another soldier saw two men giving chase, threw two hand grenades, but the men courageously continued on, passing over the grenades before they exploded. Pvt. MAHAN and his companion jumped out of the trench in the face of intense fire from covering weapons and, after making a short cut around a bend in the trench, leaped on the fleeing enemy soldiers. After a hand-to-hand battle, they subdued one and killed the other. Firing the prearranged signal, the men returned to the platoon with their captive. The patrol was reorganized and made its way back across the river without loss to themselves. Pvt. MAHAN's audacity and exemplary bravery enabled the platoon to accomplish its mission and were in keeping with the finest traditions of the Armed Forces of the United States. Entered military service from Calico Rock, Arkansas.


MAJKA, EUGENE W. Sgt. G.O. #171, 24 March 45, 104th Inf. Div.
Sgt.Euguene W. MAJKA, Infantry, Company B, 413th Infantry, United States Army, for gallantry in action in Germany on 24 March 1945. With no thought for his personal safety, Sgt. MAJKA advanced through heavy, observed enemy fire to observe and direct artillery fire on an enemy tank approaching his squad's position. He later personnaly set up a mine defense of his sector. When friendly armored units were ready to pass through the area, he again braved the shelling to clear roads of his own and enemy mines while under direct enemy observaton and fire. Sgt. Majka's self assigned actions reflect the highest credit upon himself and the Armed Forces of the United States. Entered military service from Cleveland, Ohio.


MAJOR, JOHN J. S/Sgt. G.O. #12, 12 Nov 44, 104th Inf. Div.
S/Sgt. John J. MAJOR, a member of the same platoon, and on the same night of the First Battalion’s advance to Sprundel stood silhouetted against the skyline manning the 50 Cal. machine gun mounted on his Jeep, covering the platoon although presenting an excellent target himself.

(See Citation of Richard G. Clark, cluster for Silver Star, G.O. #44, 13 Feb 45.)


MAROKUS, LEON Sgt. G.O. #45, 28 Dec 44, 104th Inf. Div.
After Lt. Sheridan was freed, the German medical officer was allowed to return to enemy lines. When it was discovered that Lt. Olsen had died as a result of wounds, Sgt. MAROKUS took stock of his meagre defenses and decided to withdraw to the double house. At approximately 0600 the group came to the two story brick building, bringing their wounded and several prisoners. A count of the men showed but forty-five present and another ten in the house at the west end of Lucherberg that had been taken first. Awarded for leadership and courage in holding Germans to terms of the truce.


MARSHALL, HENRY L. Pfc. G.O. #182, 3 Oct 45, 104th Inf. Div.
Pfc. Henry L. MARSHALL, Company B, during the attack on Cologne, helped evacuate three wounded men while under heavy SP and artillery fire, and took over command of his squad when the leader and assistant became casualties. He led the attack on a fortified house, taking ten prisoners and eliminating two machine guns.


MASTROCOVI, PATSY C. Sgt. G.O. #157, 1 June 45, 104th Inf.
 Div.Company B, after crossing according to plan, encountered the same type of opposition as Companies A and C. Sgt. Patsy C. MASTROCOVI was severely wounded by an enemy mine during the attack. Realizing that he was in a mine field, he crawled through the mine-infested field to warn his comrades.


MAUERMAN, FRANK W. Pfc. G.O. 153, 28 May 45, 104th Inf. Div.
Pfc. Frank W. MAUERMAN, Company K, on 7 April boldly advanced on an enemy machine gun emplacement which had pinned down his platoon. Disregarding the fierce enemy fire, he flanked the gun, poured a stream of fire from his automatic rifle into the emplacement, killed its crew and forced the twenty remaining Germans to surrender.


MAULDIN, JAMES A. Capt. G.O.#151, 26 May 45, 104th Inf. Div.
Leading Company G’s advance, Capt. James A MAULDIN, raced across open terrain and put an enemy machine gun crew to flight. Followed by his men, he sighted several self-propelled guns, scared off their crews with fire from his rifle, and led a bazooka team to a position where it destroyed two of six enemy guns in the town. The enemy was overcome by the boldness and swiftness of the attack and fled, after having suffered twenty-nine men killed and one captured.


MAUPIN, WILLIAM A. 2nd Lt. G.O. #48, 16 Feb 45, 104th Inf. Div.
On the 14th of November, Second Lt. William A. MAUPIN, Cannon Company forward observer with the Third Battalion, advanced to an outpost under enemy machine gun and mortar fire. At a great risk to his life he directed accurate cannon fire on the enemy machine gun emplacements from an exposed position only 50 yards from the enemy location. After neutralizing them he called for smoke fire to enable the evacuation from exposed positions of many wounded personnel.


McCULLOUGH, JACK T/5 G.O. #12, 12 Nov 44, 104th Inf. Div.
T/5 Jack MCCULLOUGH, radio operator for the platoon, calmly remained at his post in spite of the dangers to which he was exposed and warned the First Battalion of well-camouflaged, organized enemy defense positions it was then approaching.


MEDINE, MERVIN T. Sgt. G.O. #180, 27 Sept. 45, 104th Inf. Div.
Sgt. Mervin T. MEDINE, Company M, when his machine gun squad was held up in their advance to relieve other units by heavy mortar and artillery fire, went out ahead to determine enemy strength and dispositions. He then acted as a lead scout for the rifle company to which his group was attached and assisted in capturing forty prisoners and two enemy anti-tank guns. By effecting a new route of approach, the rifle company and attached tank destroyers were able to enter the two without a loss.


MERIMS, HAROLD Tech. Fourth Grade G.O. #79, 3 and 28 Nov. '44, 104th Inf. Div.
T/5 Harold MERIMS, Medical Detachment, 413th Infantry, is awarded the Silver Star Medal for gallantry in action in Holland and Germany on 3 and 28 November 1944. On 3 November 1944, at great risk to his life, Technician MERIMS made numerous trips across open terrain to administer first aid and evacuate wounded comrades. The follwoing day he again evacuated a seriously wounded man and on 28 November 1944 he rescued several men under fire and acted as an interpreter in obtaining valuable information when his platoon was cut off from friendly elements. The outstanding singular gallantry displayed by Techinicain MERIMS saved the lives of many of his comrades. His actions, far above and beyond the call of duty, were in keeping with the finest traditions of the American soldier. Entered military service from Bronx, New York.


MILLER, FRANK L. Capt. G.O. #33, 1944, 104th Inf. Div.
Captain Frank L. MILLER, Army Serial Number 0419068, Medical Corps, Medical Detachment, 413th Infantry, United States Army, is awarded the Silver Star Medal for gallantry in action in Germany on 27 November 1944. On 27 November 1944, Captain MILLER, whose normal post of duty is in the rear of the battalion command post, voluntarily moved his battalion aid station to the town where the battalion observation post was located, knowing that the town was being subjected to an intense artillery barrage. With complete disregard for his personal safety and in the face of the intense artillery barrage, Captain Miller worked unceasingly for a twenty-four-hour period, evacuating ninety-nine casualties. The intensity of the artillery fire made it necessary to move the aid station several times and five members of the detachment were wounded by the fire. Captain MILLER's courageous actions saved the lives of many soldiers, exemplifies the highest traditions of the American medical officer in his mission of mercy, and reflects the highest credit on himself and the armed forces of the United States.


MIKITA, ANTHONY Sgt. G.O. #145, 20 May 45, 104th Inf. Div.
In their advance through the factory district to the ridge northeast of Birkesdorf, Battalion forces successfully outflanked and subdued pill boxes and bunkers. Sgt. Anthony MIKITA, Company B, left his covered position and crawled through a mortar barrage over open terrain to discover what was holding up the platoon on his left flank. Observing that an enemy machine gun had pinned down the unit he moved across at great risk to his life, 1,000 yards of fire-swept terrain to destroy the enemy position.


MILLER, FRANCIS Sgt. G.O. #46, 29 Dec 44, 104th Inf. Div.
A tank in the western part of two fired almost point blank at the advancing men but they found numerous shell holes in the rough terrain in which to take cover. Leading elements got into a house in the north western part of the town after the tank wheeled about when several rounds of bazooka were fired at it. Sgt. Francis MILLER took another group into a double house surrounded by an orchard one hundred yards west of the church entrance in the center of the town.


MILLINOR, JAMES F. Lt. G.O. #38, 21 Dec 44, 104th Inf. Div.
For leadership and courage displayed 3 and 4 December.


MISKOW, VICTOR Cpl. G.O. #189, 10 Oct 45, 104th Inf. Div.
(See Citation of Edward S. Kalunian)


*MITCHELL, RICHARD M. Pfc. G.O. #19, 28 Nov 44, 104th Inf. Div.
Pfc. Richard M. MITCHELL, hearing that several wounded men had been left behind in the withdrawal, secured permission from the platoon leader to return to the area and help evacuate them. Knowing that his company was still withdrawing, he continued on his mission. A body bearing his laundry mark on the clothing and identified by comrades was buried as unknown in Henri Chappelle Cemetery.


*MOHRMAN, VIRGIL T. T/4 G.O. #13, 15 Nov 44, 104th Inf. Div.
T/4 Virgil T. MOHRMAN, Medical Detachment, left his fox-hole to aid and evacuate the wounded under heavy shell fire. When his platoon withdrew he returned to minister to the wounded, and lost his life in the action.


MOROZ, MICHAEL J. Pfc. G.O. #19, 28 Nov 44, 104th Inf. Div.
Pfc. Michael Joseph MOROZ, Medical Detachment, another aid man, on the night of 27 October moved about open terrain further lighted by burning hedgerows to give aid to and to evacuate wounded. Although subjected to intense fire he moved into adjacent areas to evacuate the wounded.


MORRIS, MELVIN E. T/5 G.O. #23, 6 Dec. 44, 104th Inf. Div.
T/5 Melvin E. MORRIS, Medical Detachment, with three other drivers took his truck forward to evacuate wounded riflemen. Although the three men with him turned back when they discovered a mine field in the road, Morris went ahead three times, against heavy fire, to evacuate the wounded, saving many lives by his actions.


MOSER, DONALD F. 1st Sgt. G.O. #46, 15 Feb 45, 104th Inf. Div.
The rear command post party coming forward from Frenz was ambushed by a strong German patrol A grenade fight took place during which two officers and three men were captured and three were killed. First Sgt. Donald F. MOSER wiped out a machine gun and then led the wire team in a get away and returned to Weisweiler.


MOSELEY, HARVEY W. 1st Pvt. G.O. #150, 7 April 45, 104th Inf. Div.
Private First Class Harvey W. MOSELEY, Infantry, Company G, 413th Infantry, for gallantry in action in Germany on 1 April 1945. After leading his platoon across two hundred yards of open terrain, Pvt. MOSELEY, acting platoon leader, rose to an upright position and led a furious charge on the enemy. Although hit by enemy fire, he pressed forward relentlessly and was again wounded while moving to protect the flank of the platoon. Despite the hail of fire, he continued to press forward until he collapsed from loss of blood. Pvt. Moseley's fearless gallantry and aggressive leadership so inspired his men that they overran the objective, killing six enemy soldiers and capturing twenty-two prisoners. His actions, far above and beyond the call of duty, exemplify the finest traditions of the American soldier and combat leader. Entered military service from Mansfield, Ohio.


NEEDHAM, FRED E. Maj. G.O. #21, 21 Jan 45, 104th Inf. Div.
At 1600 the advance was impeded by heavy mortar fire falling on the bottleneck routes into the city. Major Fred E. NEEDHAM, battalion commander, took personal command of assault groups in this action. In directing the attack he climbed a slag pile which afforded excellent view of the surrounding terrain. He remained here until the position became untenable due to intense artillery fire at which time he moved his observation to a position with the foremost elements.


NEILL, ROBERT G. 1st Lt. G.O. #13, 15 Nov 44, 104th Inf. Div.
Knowing that the bridge was heavily mined since on the previous day he had voluntarily accompanied an English officer in reconnoitering the river and its approaches, First Lt. Robert G. NEILL, Headquarters Company, First Battalion, with utter disregard for his own safety reached the bridge in spite of the hail of bullets and shrapnel, overpowered the guard, and cut the wires leading to the demolitions.


NILES, HARVEY A. 1ST Lt. G.O. #170, 12 Jan 45, 104th Inf. Div.
Moving abreast Companies B and C entered the town from the southwest. At first opposition was slight. When Company A began moving into the northwest section enemy resistance stiffened. First Lt. Harvey A. NILES, Company C, led his platoon through heavily mined fields, later returning with an aid team to rescue wounded. While leading his men across fire-swept terrain, he encountered a pill-box and captured it. In spite of severe losses, he then led half the remaining men against fierce resistance and counter attacks. The approaches to this sector of Arnoldsweiler were guarded by strategically located machine guns.


NOLAN, KENNETH P. Sgt. G.O. #219, 16 April 45, 104th Inf. Div.
Sergeant NOLAN’S heavy machine gun section was employed as a part of a motorized patrol engaged in ground combat against the enemy. The patrol was ambushed by approximately 250 enemy infantry troops and became the object of intense point blank enemy fire. Sergeant NOLAN, noticing three 20-mm anti-aircraft weapons approximately 300 yards from his vehicle, immediately opened fire and damaged two of the weapons, rendering them inactive, and forcing the crew of the third to take cover. When enemy machine gun fire struck his vehicle, Sergeant NOLAN dismounted, cradled his heavy machine gun in his arms and continued to direct devastating fire upon the enemy forces. Sergeant NOLAN was the last man to leave the area and, still firing from the hip, he covered the withdrawal of his patrol.


NOLAN, WILLIAM R. S/Sgt. G.O. #197, 1945, 104th Inf. Div.
Staff Sergeant William R. Nolan (then Private First Class) (Army Serial Number 12138599, Infantry, Company I, 413th Infantry, United States Army, is awarded the Silver Star Medal for gallantry in action in Germany on 22 November 1944. With unfaltering courage and devotion, Sergeant NOLAN worked his way through a fire-raked orchard on five voluntary missions of mercy, aiding in the treatment and immediate evacuation of his wounded comrades. His gallant actions exemplified the finest military traditions and reflected the highest credit upon himself and the armed forces of the United States. Entered military service from Rochester, New York.
By command of the Division Commander.


NOTEBAERT, THOMAS G. Pfc.  G.O. #164, 12 May 1945, 104th Inf. Div.
Private First Class Thomas G. Notebaert (then Private) (Army Serial Number 36583966), Infantry, Company F, 414th Infantry, United States Army, is awarded the Silver Star Medal for gallantry in action in Germany on 18 November 1944. At great risk to his life, Private NOTEBAERT voluntarily dashed through devastating enemy fire to man a machine gun on a deserted tank. Despite intense enemy fire, Private NOTEBAERT left the tank, made his way to the rear, and learned how to fire the 75 MM gun in the turret. Again braving the heavy fire, he returned to the tank and successfully knocked out an enemy machine gun next and pillbox. Private NOTEBAERT's actions exemplified the finest traditions of the American soldier and reflect great credit upon himself and the armed forces of the United States. Entered military service from Detroit, Michigan.
By command of the Division Commander.


NYBORG, RUSSELL Pfc. G.O. #92, 30 March 45, 104th Inf. Div.
Pfc. Russell NYBORG, Company B, fearlessly fired his machine gun at the counter-attacking enemy until his gun jammed, when he seized an M1 and continued the fire, killing six of the onrushing enemy. Although wounded later in the night he refused to be evacuated until directly ordered to submit to treatment.


O’CONNELL, MAURICE A. S/Sgt. G.O. #23, 6 Dec 44, 104th Inf. Div.
The plan decided on was to withdraw in three waves with leap frog protection on the right flank. Staff Sergeant Maurice O'CONNELL was wounded while leading a squad but took command of his platoon when the platoon leader assumed command of the company.


O’NEILL, JR., JEREMIAH F. Cpl. G.O. #147, 17 April 45, 104th Inf. Div.
Corporal Jeremiah F. O’Neill, Jr., Field Artillery, Battery A, 386th Field Artillery Battalion, United Sates Army, is awared the Silver Star for gallantry in action in Germany on 17 April 1945. When his radio was hit by a sniper's bullet, Cpl. O’Neill exposed himself to heavy enemy small arms fire to cross open terrain to procure a new radio. Returning to his position along the same treacherous route, he set up his radio and skillfully directed artillery fire on enemy infantry massing for a counter attack. By his intrepid gallantry and coolness under fire, Cpl. O’Neill smashed an enemy assault and undoubtedly saved the lives of many of his comrades. His actions, far above and beyond the call of duty, reflect the highest credit upon himself and the armed forces of the United States. Entered military service from Saratoga Springs, New York.


PADDLEFORD, FRANK L. Pfc. G.O. #171, 25 Feb 45, 104th Inf. Div.
Private First Class Frank L. Paddleford, Infantry, Company F, 413th Infantry, United States Army, for gallantry in action in Germany on 25 February 1945. When a comrade was hit by enemy fire while crossing a courtyard of an enemy-held castle, Private Paddleford, with no thought to his personal safety, ran to his aid and brought him back to safety. He then came upon two enemy mortar crews, surprising them and killing or taking them prisoner. Later he returned and manned the enemy weapons for twenty minutes. Private Paddleford's self-assigned action, far above and beyond the call of duty, exemplify the highest traditions of the American combat soldier. Entered military service from Lincoln, Nebraska.


PATTON, LUKE U. Pfc. G.O. #182, 3 Oct 45, 104th Inf. Div.
Foot troops fought to gain one-half of Eibelshausen. Pfc. Luke U. PATTON, Company L, hit one panzer at twenty-five yards with a bazooka. Crewmen tried to start the motor and PATTON let them have two more. Six Germans in black panzer uniforms clambered out, their hands in the air. Company K accounted for one self-propelled 88. Troops discovered a 120 mm. mortar factory in the town.


PEAKE, DONALD A. 2nd Lt. G.O. #35, 18 Dec 44, 104th Inf. Div.
While Company F made a feint, Company E and Company G carried boats over 900 yards of swamp in irregular formation to the river bank and crossed. Their boats were fired on by snipers and machine guns. Second Lt. Donald A. PEAKE, Company G, directed the movement of two assault boats to a point on the river where they were to meet five others. Finding the others not at the site but still at the point from where they were to start, pinned down, he returned to their position and led them across the fire-swept field to the river, where they made the crossing with few casualties. After the crossing they took a heavy toll of the enemy, knocked out two machine guns and captured several prisoners.


PENCE, JAMES H. Pfc. G.O. #33, 16 Dec 44, 104th Inf. Div.
Pfc. James H. PENCE, Company F. distinguished himself by advancing under machine gun and small arms fire shooting his automatic rifle from the hip to enable his platoon to advance to take an objective of six houses on the northern edge of the city.


PERRY, BYRNE Pfc. G.O. #160, 4 June 45, 104th Inf. Div.
Pfc. Byrne PERRY, Company B, at great risk to his life volunteered to contact his commanding officer when his company encountered intense mortar and self-propelled artillery fire, and means of communication were destroyed. Running across 400 yards of fire-swept terrain he delivered his message pointing out enemy gun positions. Although seriously wounded he refused treatment until his objective was accomplished.


PETRUCCO, DAVID A. Pfc.  G.O. #198,  22 Oct 45,  104th Inf. Div.
For gallantry in action in Holland on 2 and 3 November 1944.  Private PETRUCCO voluntarily assisted in the evacuation of forty or fifty casualties when enemy resistance was exceptionally heavy. It was necessary to carry them from a canal across two hundred yards of muddy terrain, which was subject to heavy enemy artillery, mortar, machine gun and small arms fire, to the rear. While returning to his unit after saving the lives of many of his comrades, Private PETRUCCO was killed by enemy mortar fire. This unselfish devotion to the welfare of his wounded comrades, at the cost of his own life, exemplifies the finest traditions of the American combat soldier and reflects the highest credit upon Private PETRUCCO and the Armed forces of the United States.


PIERCE, CLAUDE L. S/Sgt. G.O. #150, 25 May 45, 104th Inf. Div.
Staff Sargeant Claude L. PIERCE, Jr, (then Pfc), Infantry, Company A, 414th Infantry Regiment, for gallantry in action in Germany on 13 April 1945. When a tank was hit and set afire by enemy artillery, Sgt. PIERCE dashed across open terrain in the face of devastating enemy fire to remove the trapped crew. Although twice knocked from the tank by the concussion of near misses from direct enemy artillery fire, he climbed back on the flaming tank, extinguished the fire, and removed the crew from the tank. After administering first-aid, he carried the more seriously wounded men across two hundred yards of fire-swept terrain to safety and medical aid. The gallantry and cool courage in the face of grave danger displayed by Sgt. PIERCE, far above and beyond the call of duty, exemplify the finest traditions of the American combat soldier. Entered military service from Easton, Pennsylvania.


PIKER, DAVID W. Pfc. G.O. #20, 1 Dec 44, 104th Inf. Div.
Company K was being harassed by mortar, artillery and machine gun fire when Pfc. David W. PIKER, unheeding of his own danger, set about on the self-appointed task of aiding and evacuating wounded comrades for a fourteen-hour period until further evacuation was possible.


POTTER, JACK E. T/3 G.O. #130, 6 May 45, 104th Inf. Div.
T/3 Jack E. POTTER, Medical Detachment, on 4 April, advanced across open fire-swept terrain to retrieve a wounded comrade, and to administer first aid under fire to three other comrades, working tirelessly throughout the day to save many lives.


POTVIN, RALPH S. Pfc. G.O. #143, 18 May 45, 104th Inf. Div.
Pfc. Ralph S. POTVIN, Company I, on 15 April with accurate machine gun fire knocked out an enemy machine gun nest and a bazooka team which were delaying the advance of his squad.


PRUITT, EVERETT E. 1st Lt. G.O. #6, 6 Jan 45, 104th Inf. Div.
On 16 December the enemy increased his activity and harassing fires, and our patrols in the main gained little information in probing the river. The Intelligence and Reconnaissance Platoon, led by First Lt. Everett PRUITT, was pinned down by small arms fire on an early evening patrol, but the platoon leader advanced on the mission alone; fired on by a machine gun as he started across the river, he continued on his way to find a possible ford.


PUESTOW, RAYMOND F. S/Sgt. G.O. #40, 23 Dec 44, 104th Inf. Div.
The Company then moved up and took positions on the west side of the lake. S/Sgt. Raymond F. PUESTOW went forward single-handed and captured two members of a German machine gun which was annoying his platoon and pinning down. Being able to understand German he persuaded the other crew members to surrender. Contact was made during the day with Company F and First Division troops.


PUGH, QUINTER D. S/Sgt. G.O. #159, 23,24 Mar 45, 104th Inf. Div.
Sgt. QUINTER D. PUGH, Company C, 413th Infantry, United States Army, for galantry in action 23,24 March 1945. Advancing under heavy enemy fire, Sgt. PUGH and his platoon destroyed an enemy machine gun nest, killing two enemy soldiers and capturing twenty-eight prisoners. The platoon's position in three houses became untenable, and a withdrawal was ordered. Skillfully maneuvering his guns to afford maximum cover, Sgt. PUGH led the withdrawal and supervised the digging of defensive positions, crossing one hundred fifty yards of open terrain in the face of devastating fire to administer first aid to, and evacuate, a seriously wounded man, saving his life.


PURYEAR, LEONARD T. S/Sgt. G.O. #162, 6 June 45, 104th Inf. Div.
S/Sgt. Leonard T. PURYEAR, Company B, assumed command when his platoon sergeant became a casualty, organized a defense, and forced counter-attacking armor to withdraw when he destroyed the lead tank with one bazooka round. He then led a furious attack on the tank-riding infantrymen, killing them.


QUINN, GERALD A. Chaplain G.O. #12, 12 Nov 44, 104th Inf. Div.
In the early morning hours, Chaplain Gerald A. QUINN constantly exposed himself, moving about the field in the Third Battalion sector in spite of intense fire to comfort the wounded. In one instance he moved across an open field being raked by fire to reach a wounded man in a ditch, and returned to lead litter bearers to evacuate the man.


REGAN, HOMER S. 1st Sgt. G.O. #47, 30 Dec 44, 104th Inf. Div.
(See Citation of Capt. Albert Eister)


REINHOFER, JOSEPH J. Sgt. G.O. #111, 18 April 45, 104th Inf. Div.
Sgt. Joseph J. REINHOFER, Company C, with his squad held a house in advance of the company line. When the enemy counter-attacked in force, he led the squad in a desperate defense, exposing himself at a window to throw hand grenades and inflicting thirty casualties on the Germans, holding them off until dawn when his attic position was rescued. During this emergency Company D mortars had to fire at extreme range.


REPMAN, HARRY J. Capt. G.O. #36, 5 Feb 45, 104th Inf. Div.
Captain Harry J. REPMAN, Medical Corps, Medical Detachment, 414th Infantry, United States Army, for gallantry in action in Germany on 18 November 1944. In their attack on enemy emplacements an infantry company met stubborn resistance and heavy fire from an enemy entrenched in well-concealed positions on the edge of a woods and heavy artillery fire directed from observation posts on the surrounding high ground. Heavy casualties were suffered by the company, and when all movment of wounded from the forward area ceased, Captain REPMAN, battalion surgeon, realizing that complications would develop and loss of life would result from delayed evacuation, turned his aid station over to his assistant and advanced toward the position of the assault units. With utter fearlessness he moved 500 yards through intense enemy fire, and upon arriving at the company command post less than 100 yards from the most forward elements, he established a tempoary aid station in a small clearing in a wooded area. Disregarding the flying shrapnel and deadly "tree-bursts", he remained at his self-assigned post treating the wounded. When a route of evacuation was made available by the advance of adjacent units, he organized litter-bearer squads and instructed them in the proper route of evacuation. For five hours Capt. REPMAN voluntarily exposed himself to the intense enemy fire, treating a constant stream of wounded soldiers and shuttling them to the rear with litter teams. Capt. REPMAN's great personal courage, complete disregard for personal safety, and unwavering devotion to his fellow soldiers were in keeping with the highest traditions of the American medical officer in his mission of mercy. Entered military service from Charleroy, Pennsylvania..


REYNOLDS, FREDERICK D. Pfc. G.O. #23, 6 Dec 44, 104th Inf. Div.
T/5 Robert W. Stevens and Pfc. Frederick D. REYNOLDS, Medical Detachment, after the withdrawal of Company L had been ordered remained behind to aid the wounded and led litter bearers to them.


RIFLEMAN, JAMES E. Lt. G.O. #144, 19 May 45, 104th Inf. Div.
First Lt. James E. RIFLEMAN, Company I, on the same day reconnoitered ahead of troops engaged in clearing out a town, forced three enemy machine guns to surrender and returned to his company with vital information concerning enemy forces.


ROBINSON, MYRON L. Pfc. G.O. #166, 10 June 45, 104th Inf. Div.
Pfc. Myron L. ROBINSON, Infantry, Company C, 415th Infantry, US Army, is awarded the Silver Star Medal for gallantry in action in Germany on 1 April 1945. During a strong enemy counter attack, Private ROBINSON occupied a dug-in position near a road leading into a town. The main enemy thrust, spearheaded by five self propelled guns and fifty infantrymen was launched on this road. With total disregard for his life, Private ROBINSON moved to an exposed position and fired his bazooka until he had demolished one of the self propelled guns. Moving across one hundred fifty yards of open terrain to completely destroy the gun, he climbed on it, lifted the cover of the turret, and dropped in an activated hand grenade. The heroism and coolness under fire displayed by Private ROBINSON, far above and beyond the call of duty, exemplify the finest tradition of the American combat soldier. Entered military service from Corvallis, Oregon.


ROGERS, EUGENE W. S/Sgt. G.O. #165, 9 June 45, 104th Inf. Div.
During one of the counter-attacks a Company E platoon was forced to withdraw, leaving the squad led by S/Sgt. Eugene W. ROGERS surrounded. As defensive artillery fell about him the sergeant organized his squad in a house, enabling the men to annihilate twice their number of enemy.


*ROSENCRANZ, HERBERT J. Pfc. G.O. #170, 12 June 45, 104th Inf. Div.
Pfc. Herbert J. ROSENCRANZ, Company C., while leading his squad forward, encountered a large force of enemy troops preparing to launch a counter attack. He exposed himself to enemy artillery fire to determine the location of the enemy and then quickly organized defenses. When the enemy attacked, he led his men in a furious fight, inflicting heavy losses on the enemy. Pfc. ROSENCRANZ was severely wounded in the action.


*ROST, LOWELL H. S/Sgt. G.O. #48, 14 November 1944, 104th Inf. Div.
S/Sgt. Lowell H. ROST, Infantry, Company D, 414th Infantry, US Army, for gallantry in action in Germany on 16 November 1944. On the afternoon of 16 November 1944 the company to which Sgt. ROST was assigned, while attacking across rolling, sparsely wooded terrain, was pinned down by surprise, first from enemy machine guns and was held in place by sporadic bursts of grazing fire and a heavy concentration of enemy mortar fire. Sgt. ROST, leader of a heavy machine gun section, was unable to return the fire because of the rolling terrain and the proximity of friendly troops. Leaving the last covered position in the rear, Sgt. ROST displaced one gun and led it forward to a position of partial defilade 150 yards from the enemy emplacements and, not wishing to waste fire on a well-concealed enemy weapon, decided to move his second gun to an exposed position from which accurate fire could be placed on the enemy. Instructing the squad leaders of both guns to open fire instantly if the enemy disclosed its position by firing, Sgt. ROST, at great risk to his life dashed across the open field toward the position occupied by the company. In this action he lost his life, but the bursts of fire marked the targets for his gunners, and together they raked the enemy, the company quickly reached its objective. With full knowledge of the danger he was facing, Sgt. ROST voluntarily exposed himself to enemy fire in executing his daring but well laid plan. At the cost of his life, he displayed gallant leadership far above and beyond his call of duty that reflects the highest honor upon Sgt. ROST and exemplifies the finest traditions of the armed forces of the United States. Entered military servive from Minneapolis, Minnesota.


ROTZELL, CHARLES W. 2nd Lt. G.O. #14, 16 Nov 44, 10rth Inf. Div.
Second Lt. Charles W. ROTZELL, Medical Administrative Corps, organized a provisional platoon of litter bearers which crossed the river to evacuate forty-six casualties under heavy fire.


RUSCITTI, EDWARD T. T/SGT G.O. # 200, 25 Sept. 1945, 413 Inf. Div.
Technical Sergeant Edward T. RUSCITTI (then Staff Sergeant), Infantry, Company A, 413th Infantry, United States Army, for gallantry in action in Holland on 29 October 1944. With utter disregard for his personal safety, Sergeant RUSCITTI voluntarily exposed himself to intense artillery and machine gun fire to neutralize an enemy machine gun position and effectively repel a strong patrol, thus concealing the strength and positions of his own unit.


*RUSSI, ROBERT W. Maj. G.O. #13, 15 Nov 44, 104th Inf. Div.
Maj. Robert RUSSI led a patrol in attacking a house occupied by snipers harassing the Third Battalion Command Post. The patrol also investigated a church steeple which afforded excellent observation of the town. A German officer inside, who had been directing the deadly barrage, saw his position was hopeless and called fire on himself before he was forced to divulge information leading to the location of the mortars and 88 mm. guns. A few minutes later in the street, Maj. RUSSI was killed by a mortar shell. Maj. John Jeavons of the Second Battalion was also killed, while exposing himself to direct his men to cover.


*SANDMOEN, LOREN R. Sgt. G.O. #93, 31 March 45, 104th Inf. Div.
Sgt. Loren R. SANDMOEN crawled to a forward position where he could deliver effective mortar fire on enemy positions. He was mortally wounded when he stepped on a mine while dashing forward to reach high ground.


*SANSOUCIE, CHESTER D. S/Sgt. G.O. #145, 20 May 45, 104th Inf. Div.
Company C made a successful crossing, but was subjected to heavy sniper and machine gun fire in seizing the factory. A shu mine field also surrounded their objective. S/Sgt. Chester D. SANSOUCIE, at great risk to his life crossed a wide expanse of open terrain to wipe out a machine nest which was holding up the advance of the company. SANSOUCIE coolly rushed the gun, killed the gunner but was mortally wounded by an enemy hand grenade.


SARRICA, ANTHONY J. S/Sgt. G.O. #154, 29 May 45, 104th Inf. Div.
S/Sgt. Anthony J. SARRICA, Company K, on 8 April destroyed single-handedly with a bazooka an enemy self-propelled gun which was pouring devastating fire on his squad. As another SP moved into position he also accounted for it with several more bazooka rounds.


SAWYER, RALPH H. S/Sgt. G.O. #29, 21 November 1944, 104th Inf. Div.
Staff Sergeant RALPH H. SAWYER, (Army Serial Number 38287003) Infantry, Company A, 414th Infantry, United States Army, for gallantry in action in Germany. On 21 November 1944, Sergeant SAWYER's platoon was the leading unit in an attack on the outskirts of a town. Unexpected resistance in the form of intense artillery, mortar, and small arms fire, inflicting many casualties, pinned the entire platoon to the ground in the middle of an open field. Upon receipt of an order to withdraw, Sergeant SAWYER voluntarily moved forward to the leading elements of the platoon. With complete disregard for his personal safety and in the face of intense fire from the enemy strongly entrenched in buildings and along a railroad embankment, Sergeant SAWYER moved from squad to squad directing the fire of automatic weapons in such a manner that effective fire covered the organized withdrawal of the platoon. Sergeant SAWYER remained, constantly exposing himself to the devatating fire, to check each of the casualties and definitely determining that none of his comrades were left behind. In one instance it was necessary for him to move to within fifty yards of fixed enemy positions in order to accomplish his self-assigned task. His superior leadership and utter disregard for his personal safely reflect the highest credit on Sergeant SAWYER and the armed forced of the United States. Entered military service from Dallas, Texas.


SCHALLMOSER, JOSEPH M. Pfc. G.O. #8, 8 January 1945, 104th Inf. Div.
Private First Class JOSEPH M. SCHALLMOSER, Infantry, Company I, 413th Infantry, United States Army, for gallantry in action in Germany on 16 November 1944. On 16 November three pillboxes held up the advance of the company to which Pvt. SCHALLMOSER was assigned. Private SCHALLMOSER assisted in the assault of the first of the pillboxes, and when darkness prevented further offensive action against the second, he volunteered to accompany a captured enemy oficer to try to effect the surrender of the second pillbox, whose close proximity to the captured pillbox made it likely that it could be recaptured or neutralized by the enemy. At great risk to his life as a result of the shelling and possible trickery by the enemy, Pvt. SCHALLMOSER set out across the fire-swept terrain with the enemy officer, and by skillful maneuvering and many intervals of waiting, reached the enemy-held pillbox. His aggressive action and diplomatic and ingenious persuasion effected the capture of 28 enemy soldiers with whom he returned to his lines. Pvt. SCHALLMOSER's courageous action, above and beyond the call of duty, undoubtedly saved the lives of many of his comrades and exemplified the finest traditions of the armed forces of the United States. Entered military service from Chicago, Illinois.


SCHMIDT, JAMES H. Pfc. G.O. #75, 14 March 1945, 104th Inf. Div.
Private First Class James H. SCHMIDT (then Private) (Army Serial Number 17119822). Infantry, Company D, 413th Infantry, United States Army, for gallantry in action in Germany on 29 November 1944. When his company became cut off from friendly troops, Private SCHMIDT voluntarily risked his life to reconnoiter a covered route to rejoin the battalion. Despite intense enemy fire he crossed 300 yards of open, fire-swept terrain, and returned to lead his company to safety. Private SCHMIDT's outstanding gallentry, intrepidity, and extreme sense of responsibility above and beyond the call of duty reflect the greatest credit upon himself and the armed forces of the United States. Entered military service from Hugoton, Kansas.


SEIFERT, JOHN S/Sgt. G.O. #41, 10 Feb 1945, 104th Inf. Div.
Staff Sergeant John SEIFERT( Army Serial Number 35673353), Infantry, Company L, 414th Infantry, United States Army, for gallantry in action in Germany on December 5, 1944. The company to which Sergeant SEIFERT was assigned attacked a huge factory in the early morning hours, driving the enemy to prepared positions across the narrow street from the factory. After repelling several counter attacks the company consolidated its position , and the enemy immediately placed incessant concentrations of artillery and mortar fire on their positions. Despite the intense fire the company retained its position and prepared to meet the counter attack which would inevitably follow the barrage. As the enemy infantry moved out of their positions, Sergeant SEIFERT led his light machine gun squad to the threatened point and directed fire against the attacking forces. Then, with complete disregard for his personal safety, he moved to an exposed position and fired rifle grenades at the advancing enemy troops and forced them to withdraw. Exhausting his supply of grenades, he crawled back to the factory, seized an enemy anti-tank rocket launcher, moved through the devestating fire to his former position, and forced the enemy to abandon two machine gun emplacements with his accurate fire. As the enemy ran from their positions, Sergeant SEIFERT's machine guns pinned them to the ground and inflicted numerous casualties. When the company was ordered to withdraw, Sergeant SEIFERT voluntarily covered the withdrawal by firing rockets at the enemy from an exposed position. The fearlessness and initiative of Sergeant SEIFERT throughout this action were responsible for the destruction of several enemy emplacements, the repulsion of a counter attack, and the successful withdrawal of the company prior to elimination of enemy fortifications by friendly artillery. His heroic actions, executed with complee disregard for personal safety, reflect the highest credit on himself and the armed forces of the United States. Entered military service from Dayton, Kentucky.


SHAW, EUGENE A. Capt. G.O. #139, 14 May 45, 104th Inf. Div.
Capt. Engene A. SHAW, 929th Field Artillery Battalion liaison officer and his driver were captured on 31 March and returned on 5 April with vital information as to strength, disposition, and composition of enemy troops in the area. When he learned that friendly troops were nearby, Capt. SHAW led two other captured men through artillery fire from both sides and through the enemy lines to safety, the trio being disguised as French refugees.


SHEENAN, CHARLES E. S./Sgt. G.O. #40, 23 Dec 44, 104th Inf. Div.
Staff Sgt. Charles E. SHEENAN, K Company, led his squad in repelling the counter-attack in an outstanding manner and led three men across a fire-swept field to evacuate the platoon leader.


SHIPLEY, JOHN D. Lt. G.O. #38, 21 Dec 44, 104th Inf. Div.
…for heroic actions on 3-5 December 1944. Lt. SHIPLEY organized a command post in the basement. 1st Lt. Arthur A. Ulmer, artillery forward observer, whose party had been separated from the infantry but continued to push forward to town, arrived. SHIPLEY organized a defense. Holes had been chopped in the walls to provide fields of fire for the machine guns on the west side of the house where there were no windows. Since there were only doors to allow communication between the two sides of the house a large portion of the wall was cut away. An observation post was established in the attic floor.


SHOCKCOR, ROGER F. 1st Lt. G.O. #89, 27 March 45, 104th Inf. Div.
First Lt. Roger F. SHOCKCOR left his covered position to reconnoiter friendly and enemy positions. Observing an enemy machine gun harassing his troops, he crossed a field in the face of the continued heavy fire and, cleverly maneuvering himself to the rear of the gun, forced the crew to surrender.


SHOTTS, CHARLES F. T/Sgt. G.O. #89, 27 March 45, 104th Inf. Div.
(See Citation of Sgt. James O. Franklin.)


*SHUGERT, HOWARD W. Pfc. G.O. #35, 18 Dec 44, 104th Inf. Div.
Pfc. Howard SHUGERT was a member of a combat patrol of Company G charged with setting up a road block. He volunteered to make a dangerous reconnaissance, during which he killed one German, captured another and returned with vital information as to the deployment of enemy troops. He volunteered for a second patrol which was ambushed, and suffered fatal wounds.


SIEBEN, JAMES G. S/Sgt. G.O. #141, 16 May 45, 104th Inf. Div.
Staff Sergeant James G. SIEBEN (Army Serial Number 17157619). Infantry, Company F, 414th Infantry, United States Army, for gallantry in action in Germany on 30 March 1945. As tanks approached to assist in clearing out a town, Sergeant SIEBEN dashed across open, fire-swept terrain to mount the turret of a tank and direct fire which eliminated several enemy snipers. Later, when a tank was hit and set afire by enemy bazooka fire, he dashed into the open in the face of a hail of automatic weapons fire to extinguish the flames and save the tank from certain destruction. By his courage, quick thinking., and cool courage in the face of grave danger, Sergeant SIEBEN contributed materially to the success of an important operation, and his actions, above and beyond the call of duty, exemplify the finest traditions of the American combat soldier. Entered military service from Hastings, Minnesota.


SIEBEN, JAMES G. S/Sgt. G.O. #166, 10 June 45, 104th Inf. Div
SILVER STAR MEDAL (OAK LEAF CLUSTER) S/Sgt. James G. SIEBEN Infantry, Company F, 414th Infantry, in action in Germany on 17 November 1944. At great risk to their lives, Sergeant SIEBEN and two comrades crossed open terrain to search for one of the officers in their company who had been reported missing. They located the officer and found that he was severely wounded. Abandoning all attempts to seek cover or concealment, Sergeant SIEBEN and his companions carried the wounded officer back to their lines through a hail of small arms and mortar fire. The gallant intrepidity and intense devotion to duty and to his comrades displayed by Sergeant SIEBEN exemplify the finest traditions of the American soldier and reflect distinct credit upon himself and the military forces of the United States. Entered military service from Hastings, Minnesota.


SIMMONS, MERLE T. S/Sgt. G.O. #38, 21 Dec 44, 104th Inf. Div.
In the attack of a slag pile by the First Battalion, heavy machine gun and artillery fire directed from Hill 287 limited the advance after the initial success to this point. During this time Staff Sgt. Merle T. SIMMONS, Medical Detachment, twice crossed open terrain in the sector of Company A to render first aid to an enlisted man who had been wounded while leading the attack and led stretcher bearers forward from the rear to evacuate the wounded from the area.


SKORUPSKI, NORBERT J. S/Sgt. G.O. #23, 6 Dec 44, 104th Inf. Div.
On this day Staff Sgt. Norbert J. SKORUPSKI of Company K led a successful attack on a house in front of positions gained on 18 November. Though wounded in the arm he continued to lead his men in the subsequent fighting. When the company was pinned down a hundred yards from its objective he organized a defense. Up to this time he had taken ten prisoners and killed a number of the enemy.


SMITH, NOWLIN J. Sgt. G.O. #22, 4 Dec 44, 104th Inf. Div.
Sgt. Nowlin J. SMITH, Company A, was in a group separated from friendly troops after the river crossing. He resisted enemy counter-attacks and by his coolness and courage contributed greatly to the success of the garrison’s holding efforts. (Soldier’s Medal.)


*SNIDER, JOHN E. Sgt. G.O. #20, 20 Jan 45, 104th Inf. Div.
(See Citation of Pfc. Edwin Cook.)


SNYDER, DAVID G. 1ST Lt. G.O. #19, 28 Nov 44, 104th Inf. Div.
First Lt. David G. SNYDER, Company L, whose company was acting as advance guard for the Third Battalion, in his capacity as platoon leader covered the successful withdrawal of his company from deadly fire. Of his own volition he returned along the route of withdrawal to aid and evacuate the wounded.


SOAPES, CLAUDE D. Pfc. G.O. #38, 21 Dec 44, 104th Inf. Div.
Pfc. Claudia D. SOAPES came upon a machine gun just beyond the railroad track which had been bypassed by the First Platoon. He rushed forward and eliminated the position with hand grenades.


STAGE, JOHN L. Pfc. G.O. #93, 31 March 45, 104th Inf. Div.
(See Citation of Ignacio Hernandez.)


STARR, HAROLD C. S/Sgt. G.O. #19, 28 Nov 44, 104th Inf. Div.
(See Citation of Pvt. Otto Bytof.)


STETHERS, PAUL G. Pfc. G.O. #127, 3 May 45, 104th Inf. Div.
Pfc. Paul G. STETHERS, Company A, led his platoon to their objective. On the morning of 25 February his platoon was reduced to almost half-strength and surrounded in a barn yard by a strong force of enemy. He engaged in a fire-fight with a burp-gunner and killed him. Later wounded, he continued to fire on the enemy, refusing to be evacuated.


STEVENS, ROBERT W. T/5 G.O. #23, 6 Dec 44, 104th Inf. Div.
(See Citation of Pfc. Frederick D. Reynolds.)


STRIDER, HAYNES L. S/Sgt. G.O. #170, 12 June 45, 104th Inf. Div.
Staff Sergeant Haynes L. STRIDER (then Private First Class), Infantry, Company C, 414th Infantry, U.S. Army, for gallantry in action in Germany on 17 November 1944. Sergeant STRIDER volunteered to lead a rescue party far into enemy territory to evacuate a serioulsy wounded comrade. Although constantly under heavy enemy fire, he and his party made a thorough search behind enemy lines. Locating the man, he hurriedly administered first aid and evacuated him back through the enemy lines to safety. The courage and heroism displayed by Sergeant STRIDER, far above and beyond the call of duty, and his complete disregard for his personal safety are in keeping with the highest traditions of the armed forces of the United States. Entered military service from Hardin, Missouri.


SUSSKIND, MURRAY S. S/Sgt. G.O. #182, 3 Oct 45, 104th Inf. Div.
S/Sgt. Murray S. SUSSKIND, Company L, foiled attempts of the enemy to infiltrate his squad’s outpost. Although wounded he stayed at his post for five hours.


TARULLI, VITO T/Sgt. G.O. #169, 12 June 45, 104th Inf. Div.
T/Sgt. Vito TARULLI skillfully maneuvered his platoon to provide a base of fire and then led an assault on another machine gun. He succeeded in silencing the gun and captured its crew.


TAYLOR, ROBERT E. Pfc. G.O. #28, 11 Dec 44, 104th Inf. Div.
Pfc. Robert E. TAYLOR went out to assist in bringing back the wounded, along with another man of Company G. His comrade was wounded while they were carrying a casualty to a sheltered position but Taylor continued to lead litter bearers to the wounded men, even when he was later stricken himself.


TERRILL, CHARLES W. S/Sgt. G.O. #149, 24 May 45, 104th Inf. Div.
Company G met and repulsed a counter-attack from the east at 1745. S/Sgt. Charles W. TERRILL led his squad to a position within 200 yards of the enemy force. Discovering that the enemy was advancing with three SP’s and fifty infantrymen, he secured a bazooka and raced to a position within twenty-five yards of the advancing Germans. Under heavy enemy fire he remained cool, knocked out the leading SP and forced the remaining guns and supporting infantry to withdraw.


THOMAS, AUBREY W. Pfc. G.O. #27, 10 Dec 44, 104th Inf. Div.
During this action Pfc. Aubrey W. THOMAS of Company F, although wounded, voluntarily led litter bearers under shell fire for hours to pick up wounded lying in the exposed areas before he would submit to treatment and evacuation.


THOMPSON, LOYCE N. Pfc. G.O. #162, 6 June 45, 104th Inf. Div.
(See Citation of Pfc. George W. Bollinger.)


TOLER, GORDON. Pfc. G.O. #171, 23 March 44, 104th Inf. Div.
Company I, 413th Infantry, United States Army, for gallantry in action in Germany on 23 March 1945. When a contact patrol of which he was a member encountered enemy fire from positions seventy-five yards to the front, Private TOLER fearlessly exposed himself in order to cover the withdrawal of his comrades with automatic fire from a position fifty yards to the flank, and Private TOLER, though painfully wounded by the fire, exposed himself once again to cover his comrades until they had reached a defilade position. These gallant actions exemplify the finest of military traditions, reflecting the highest credit upon Private TOLER and the armed forces of the United Sates. Entered military service from Chester, Texas.


TOUART, ANTHONY J. Col. G.O. #34, 1 January 45, 104th Inf. Div
SILVER STAR MEDAL Anthony J. Touart Col. Infantry, Headquarters, 414th Infantry, in action in Holland on 29 October 1944. On the afternoon of 29 October 1944 one of Colonel TOUART's battalions was pinned to the ground by enemy fire resulting in temporary enemy fire superiority over the entire battalion zone, including the battalion command post. Colonel TOUART with complete disregard for his personal safety, preceded to the battalion command post and remained with the battalion commander under heavy fire for the rest of the day and part of the night. Under Colonel TOUART's guidance, plans were prepared under the most difficult conditions for a night attack, involving the crossing of a barely fordable canal. So effectively were the plans promulgated and carried out under the leadership of Colonel TOUART that the battalion attacked, crossed the canal, and, continuing the assault, accomplished its mission with a minimum of casualties. On many subsequent occasions in Germany, Colonel TOUART directed the troops and inspired his officers and men to great efforts through his devotion to duty, his disregard for his own safety, and his presence with his advanced leaders. Under his leadership Colonel TOUART's regiment has secured an enviable reputation for battlefield effiency and accomplishment. His conduct under fire exemplifies the finest traditions of the army of the United States. Entered military service from Mobile, Alabama.


TUFTS, WILLIAM M. 1ST Lt. G.O. #16, 21 Nov 44, 104th Inf. Div.
1ST Lt. William M. TUFTS, whose platoon of Company C was between the First Battalion and the river, requested and was granted permission to lead a patrol of aid men and anti-tank weapons, opening a gap for the withdrawal of the Battalion. The patrol was undertaken at extreme risk to his own life, due to the organized enemy positions and the insufficient number of anti-tank weapons to combat the enemy tanks.


*TURNER, OSCAR G. Lt. G.O. #115, 25 April 45, 104th Inf. Div.
Lt. Oscar G. TURNER led an assault across open terrain on this nest and was instantly killed.


ULMER, ARTHUR A. Lt. G.O. #33, 18 Dec 44, 104th Inf. Div.
During all this struggle to throw back the fanatical Nazis, the artillery, cannons and mortars continued to hammer away at the remainder of the town for seven hours on calls from Lt. ULMER and Lt. Shipley. The latter was able to contact his mortar position in Inden directly but Lt. ULMER used the other infantry radio to contact the battalion command post. Here Capt. James F. Nealon, artillery liaison officer, relayed ULMER'S requests to the 929th fire direction center where the task was divided between the artillery available and the Cannon Company. The latter alone fired over 650 rounds bursts over the enemy. Shipley directed nearly 2000 rounds of mortar fire for the defenders. In the afternoon small arms ammunition in the hands of the troops in Lucherberg began to run low.


VENT, FRANK S/Sgt. G.O. #24, 24 Jan 45, 104th Inf. Div.
The 414th made a feint and the 413th crossed the river to the right. S/Sgt. Frank VENT, Company G, was in one of the first assault groups across the river. Upon reaching the opposite bank an enemy machine gun killed one and wounded four men in his group. Setting up a machine gun to cover his approach, he moved forward and eliminated the enemy gun with two hand grenades. He then established a road block on the dike to aid the crossing of other elements. Through this action he greatly reduced the number of casualties that would have resulted from enemy machine gun and small arms fire.


VILLAFRANCA, FREDERICK J. Sgt. G.O. #169, 12 June 45, 104th Inf. Div.
Sgt. Frederick J. VILLAFRANCA, Company I, on 10 April after his company had seized a town, was leader of the squad assigned to clear the water front to be used as a bridge site. The squad ran into machine gun, sniper and bazooka fire. A man who had crawled forward to knock out machine gun positions was severely wounded, and Sgt. VILLAFRANCA crawled forward to move the man to a covered position and administer first aid. He then advanced in the face of withering fire and eliminated the enemy machine gun nests with hand grenades.


*VOLTZ, FRANKLIN A. T/3 G.O. #45, 14 Feb 45, 104th Inf. Div.
T/3 Franklin A. VOLZ, Medical Detachment, on 2 November lost his life while giving aid to a wounded man under conditions of extreme danger. He was also cited for his brave actions on two other occasions. On 25 October he advanced across fireswept ground, on the next day returned across his company’s route of withdrawal to give sorely needed aid to the wounded.


WELGAN, MICHAEL, Pfc. G.O. #171, 24 Feb 45, 104th Inf. Div.
Private First Class Michael WELGAN (Army Serial Number 6706553), infantry, Company L, 413th Infantry United States Army, is awarded the Silver Star Medal for gallantry in action in Germany on 24 February 1945. When his platoon was caught on open ground under vicious enemy machine gun fire and direct enemy observation, Private WELGAN voluntarily exposed himself completely to put his machine gun into action. He fired steadily despite the concentration of enemy fire upon him, and at one time he rushed twenty yards into the face of the enemy to secure a better position from which to continue his self-assigned task of covering his comrades' withdrawal. Private WELGAN's gallant action, far above and beyond the call of duty, reflects the highest credit upon himself and the armed forces of the United States. Entered military service from New York City, New York.


WILKINSON, Thomas P. Pfc. G.O. #168, 12 Dec 44, 104th Inf. Div.
Private Thomas P. WILKINSON, Company C, 414th Infantry Regiment, for galantry in action in Germany on 12 December 1944. Despite withering fire which killed or wounded all officers and non-commissioned officers in his platoon, Private WILKINSON held his position as the enemy advanced in force to counter advance of a large group of enemy soldiers and a self-propelled artillery gun, inflicting heavy casualties and forcing the enemy to withdraw. By his intrepid gallantry and heroism, far above and behond the call of duty, Private WILKINSON prevented the loss of a hard won objective, reflecting the highest credit upon himself and the armed forces of the United States.


WILLIAMSON, HOWELL E. Sgt. G.O. #23, 23 Jan 45, 104th Inf. Div.
Sgt. WILLIAMSON'S party, which had become separated from Lt. Arbogast’s platoon, consisted of seventeen men, including two medics and a machine gun squad from Company D. They used a burning building as their guide and pushed on. They found, however, that they had come to a sizable village which turned out to be Pier. As daylight was approaching they stole into the closest house and took nine Germans from the cellar. Sgt. WILLIAMSON had one of the Germans in his house call across the street to some of the enemy to surrender. They obliged and his prisoner toll reached eighteen. Sgt. WILLIAMSON studied the terrain from the roof top and after sundown led his band and prisoners back to Lucherberg. He later guided the Second Battalion, 414th, to their objective by the same route.


WILSON, JAMES H. Pfc. G.O. #151, 26 May 45, 104th Inf. Div.
Pfc. James H. WILSON, in a forward observer’s party of Cannon Company, saw a seriously wounded companion in the open, and left his covered position in the face of heavy enemy fire, made his way to the man’s side where he administered first aid and carried him to shelter. He again exposed himself to secure medical aid for the man. The combined efforts of the first platoon of Company A and Company C caused the Germans in the factory to yield.


WOODSON, BISHOP T. Pfc. G.O. #161, 5 June 45, 104th Inf. Div.
Pfc. Bishop T.WOODSON, also Company B, advanced with a combat patrol to clear buildings on his company’s flank. After he and his companion captured nine Germans in one house, the enemy in adjoining buildings cut off the patrol’s withdrawal by laying down heavy machine gun and small arms fire. At great risk to his life, WOODSON flanked an enemy gun and wiped out its crew with hand grenades.


WRIGHT, JOEL W. 1st Lt. G.O. #184, 5 Oct 45, 104th Inf. Div.
1st Lt. Joel W. WRIGHT, Jr., Company G, 415th Infantry Regiment on 21 April 1945. To enable the company to gain its objective with maximum efficiency, Lt. WRIGHT was assigned the mission of securing a road junction and establishing himself in the nearby factory. Following the artillery barrage closely, he crossed eight hundred yards of flat terrain and reached his objective undetected. Once on the perimeter of the objective, he noticed an enemy sentry guarding their command post. He adeptly outwitted the sentry and captured the command post, which quartered twenty enemy soldiers. Finding himself behind the enemy line of defense, Lt. WRIGHT cautiously led his men back to this line of defense where he and his men captured the enemy position. After establishing a defensive position, he observed two enemy self-propelled guns with supporting infantrymen, which he effectively neutralized by directing artillery fire on the attacking enemy. By this series of outstanding accomplishments, Lt. WRIGHT enabled the company to gain its objective. Entered served from Asheville, NC.


ZAMBERLIN, JOHN A. Pfc. G.O. #118, 25 April 45, 104th Inf. Div.
Pfc. John A. ZAMBERLIN volunteered to scout the men forward and at dawn voluntarily dashed twenty yards across open terrain toward a house believed to be a machine gun nest. Forced to withdraw, he and a companion were wounded later in the day while attempting to contact friendly elements on the flank.


ZASO, ANTHONY B. Sgt. G.O. #171, 23 Feb 45, 104th Inf. Div.
Sgt. Anthony B. ZASO, Infantry, Company L, 413th Infantry Regiment. As Sgt. ZASO's platoon advanced to the objective, three men were seriously wounded by heavy enemy artillery and mortar fire and lay completely exposed in open terrain. Voluntarily and at great risk to his life, Sgt. ZASO left his covered position to make three trips across the fifty yards of treacherous terrain to administer first aid to, and evacuate, the three men. Sgt. ZASO's initiative and courage in the performance of the self-assigned task, above and beyond the call of duty, are in keeping with the finest traditions of the American soldier. Entered military service from Brooklyn, NY


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This page last updated: 16 Mar 2014
415th Inf Regt information compiled by Charles Norris,
National Timberwolf Association Member

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